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Samsung Merging Bada With Intel's Tizen

David Gilbert

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Samsung Intel Tizen bada

When Nokia decided to dump the MeeGo and Symbian operating systems in favour of Windows Phone 7, it looked like we were facing a world where diversity in mobile operating systems was a thing of the past.

Well it seems as if Samsung wants to change this, as it has announced that it will be merging it owns operating system, bada, with latest platform backed by Intel, called Tizen.

It was last September that two Linux software groups, one backed by Samsung, one by Intel agreed to jointly develop Tizen, a new operating system for mobile phones and other devices, by merging their LiMo and Meego platforms in a bid to gain wider industry and consumer support.

Samsung Intel Tizen bada

Now it has emerged that Samsung will be throwing bada into the mix. “We have an effort that will merge bada and Tizen,” said Tae-Jin Kang, Senior Vice President of Samsung’s Contents Planning Team in an interview with Forbes magazine at the CES.

The open-source Tizen platform supports multiple devices including smartphones, tablets, Internet-enabled TVs, netbooks and in-vehicle infotainment systems.

Samsung has recently emerged as the largest smartphone manufacturer in the world thanks to the success of Android-based phones such as the Samsung Galaxy S II, the large Galaxy Note and the world’s first Ice Cream Sandwich handset, the Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

Samung’s bada OS currently has around 2.2 per cent of the market, compared to Android’s 53 per cent of the market. While we welcome diversity in the mobile operating system market, for the new platform to succeed it will require a lot of manufacturers, and eventually customers, to take a chance on an unknown OS, which we feel will be difficult in the current market.

Source: Forbes

b166er

January 17, 2012, 5:56 pm

There's a catch 22 here. Unless developers write apps for the new platform, people won't be that interested in it and therefore developers won't write apps for it.

The only way this would work would be if Intel/Samsung wrote enough *GOOD* apps by default to tease people away from Android/WinPho/iOS

David Gilbert

January 18, 2012, 2:39 pm

I think that the only way this will become a viable platform is if it becomes ubiquitous across mobile, tablet, laptop, TV and other home devices but this would require widespread adoption by a lot of manufacturers which may not be possible.

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