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ReRAM Equals Faster, Cheaper, More Efficient Flash Storage And More…

ReRAM

We might soon be seeing the demise of the humble NAND flash drive and memory card. That’s right, your tablet’s storage and those high-speed cards in your camera may be feeling like last year’s turtle rather than this year’s hare once the cutely named ReRAM comes onto the market. Resistive RAM, to give the miracle tech its full name, not only has the potential to be significantly faster and more energy efficient, but it will be cheaper to produce too…

Researchers at University College London have created a new silicon oxide version of ReRAM that’s about a hundred times as quick as good old NAND storage while using one thousandth of the energy - and doesn’t require a vacuum to produce, meaning it will cost less to produce. It would appear that Adnan Mehonic from UCL’s Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, isn’t overstating the case when he says that “The potential for this material is huge”.

ReRAM

Did we mention ReRAM is potentially more durable too? Oh, and to top it all off, thanks to the properties of the UCL-developed material it can be used as a memristor. It’s no wonder that the tech is already set to make its way into products from the likes of Panasonic and Sharp. Suffice to say: we want. A lot.

Via Phys.org

andybee

May 21, 2012, 11:41 pm

> Oh, and to top it all off, thanks to the properties of the UCL-developed material it can be used as a memristor

What does this mean? Aren't the properties you describe in the first two paragraphs are a result of UCL's new material being made into a memristor?

Bugblatter

May 22, 2012, 4:54 am

SD and microSD cards are pitifully slow, so 100x the speed will be very welcome. The lower power consumption seems less interesting; I don't think the current tech uses much power as it is.

However what's the memory density like? Will 64GB fit on a microSD card? More, less?

TechVegan

May 22, 2012, 8:03 pm

@andybee:
Not necessarily. The UCL ReRAM can have a variable resistance depending on the last applied voltage, the property that makes it a memristor if I understand it correctly.

@Bugblatter:
Indeed, the speed potential is very exciting - but on a mobile device, every bit of power saving can be significant, and UCL's ReRAM doesn't just use a little less, but a lot less!
I would guess density will be at least equal if not better - sorry I can't give a more definite answer.

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