Kodi under pressure after Premier League’s major anti-piracy court win

The Premier League has obtained a court order that allows it to seek retribution against pirates who broadcast copyright material through Kodi-based set-top boxes in a “precise manner”. Has the whistle finally blown on dodgy streaming in the UK?

The Kodi software, often installed on low-powered, low-cost set-top boxes, has made it much easier to watch games without paying Sky or BT Sport subscription fees – bad news for traditional broadcasters, basically.

Until now, the English Premier League (EPL) had only been able to block individual streams, barely putting a dent in the pirates before new ones crop up. But the recent court victory gives the Premier League the power to have computer servers providing the streams blocked directly by ISPs.

Related: Could buying a Kodi box soon be illegal?

A Premier League spokesperson, via the BBC, said: “For the first time this will enable the Premier League to disrupt and prevent the illegal streaming of our matches via IPTV, so-called Kodi, boxes.”

The news comes just days after a man was given a suspended prison sentence and a £250,000 fine for selling ‘fully loaded’ Kodi boxes to pubs around the UK.

Malcolm Mayes, 65, sold the boxes for £1,000 after advertising them in national magazines as “100% legal.”

Back in September, the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT) described the problem as an “epidemic.”

Meanwhile, in February, five people in the UK were arrested on suspicion of selling the set-top boxes to customers around the nation.


Will this ruling spell the end for football streaming through Kodi? Or will the pirates always find a way? Share your thoughts below.