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Philips Fidelio DS9 And DS9010 IPod Docks Now Available

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Philips Fidelio DS9

Philips has launched a couple of new iPod, iPhone and iPad speaker docks which attempt to capitalise on the success of the DS9000 speaker dock launched last year.

The Fidelio DS9 and DS9010 are evolution rather than revolution when it comes to speaker docks unlike the Fidelio SoundSphere Wi-Fi Speakers we saw launched in March with AirPlay compatibility. However the SoundSphere speakers will set you back around £700 while the DS9 goes on sale this month for £299 while the larger DS9010 will set you back £399. Finances aside, the DS9 continues the styling of the DS9000 but in a more compact body. The dock makes use of SoundCurve design, which ensures all cabinets walls are curved to free the dock of internal box resonance, creating a more natural sound with less interference - so there. The DS9 contains two pairs of 19mm tweeters and 3.5in woofers, with each pair residing in their own dedicated 3litre chamber.

Philips Fidelio DS9010

PureDigital processing technology takes a direct digital output from the iPod/iPhone/iPad and this ensures all processing is handled digitally within the dock itself and is then converted by the extremely high-quality digital-to-analogue converter. The DS9010 is essentially the older DS9000 but in a anodised brushed-aluminium body. The dock still features four drivers and two 1in low distortion tweeters made from silk and copper-clad aluwire for fast, accurate response. Two 4in inverted dome woofers reside in their own 3.4litre camber, creating “class-leading bass response for the size.” Both docks will be available alongside the DS9000 from this month with the DS9010 exclusive to John Lewis stores.

these speaker docks continue where the DS9000 left off and try to offer consumers an alternative to the higher-end Bowers & Wilkins Zepplin Air and the Arcam rCube at a lower price, without the loss of too much audio quality.

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