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OS X Yosemite released as free update

Luke Johnson

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Apple OS X Yosemite

Mac owners take note, the OS X Yosemite release date has been confirmed, with Apple’s latest operating system available to download right now.

In an uncharacteristic act of kindness, Apple has made the OS X Yosemite update available as a free download, with all compatible Mac users able to give their machines a refresh with immediate effect.

Yosemite, also known as OS X 10.10, was formally unveiled at WWDC back in June. The software is a sizeable overhaul, with a flatter, more translucent design being introduced alongside a range of new features and improved iOS cross-compatibility.

Aesthetic differences aside, Yosemite’s main improvements come when using your OS X 10.10 Mac alongside other Apple products.

A new feature dubbed "Handoff" has been introduced to allow users to seamlessly swipe content from one device to another, all in real time. The system even prompts you to move across to your Mac when crafting emails when it’s nearby.

Working in both directions, OS X’s messaging system has also been revamped. With the new system, your Mac will show all of your iPhone’s messages. This is no longer limited to iMessages either, so texts finally make the cut.

Not wanting to overlook the classic means of communication, your Mac can now be used to field calls, too, even when your handset isn’t right next to the computer.

Further new Yosemite features include a Spotlight refresh, the introduction of iCloud Drive and the ability to send large files from MailDrop. For all the ins and outs, read our guide to what’s new in OS X Yosemite.

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Everlast

October 16, 2014, 6:47 pm

"In an uncharacteristic act of kindness, Apple has made the OS X Yosemite update available as a free download"
Uncharacteristic? Wasn't Mavericks before that also free, as well as all iOS updates?

Paul W

October 16, 2014, 8:26 pm

Yep, Mavericks was free. Apple makes most of their money on hardware (unlike Microsoft) so they can afford to give away their software for free. It's not such an uncharacteristic move - as you noted.

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