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Meet MLB’s newest bench coach; the Apple iPad Pro

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iPad Pro

Perhaps fed up of Microsoft getting all the glory (or not) for its partnership with the NFL, Apple has joined forces with Major League Baseball to give the iPad Pro a starring role in the big leagues.

From this season, which commences in less than a week, MLB teams will have access to scouting reports and analytical data via Apple’s made-for-professionals tablet (via WSJ).

The lowdown on the opposition's wicked knuckle-ball and star hitter's slugging percentage against lefties will be delivered via a specially-designed MLB Dugout app.

Coaches and players will also be able to watch videos of previous plays and access a host of statistics from current and past seasons.

See also: iPad Pro vs Surface Pro 4

The app is the result of a collaboration between MLB’s brilliant Advanced Media division and Apple itself.

In the data-driven world of professional baseball portrayed in Moneyball, the tablets should do wonders for teams currently relying on old fashioned binders filled with stacks of paper.

The introduction marks a major change for the sport, which has more than most attempted to stay true to its traditions. Up until now smartphones, tablets and laptops have been banned from MLB dugouts.

"We're not just replacing binders with tablets, we're actually helping them do things that weren't possible before," says Apple’s PR guru Phil Schiller.

Microsoft has been providing coaching assistance to NFL players and coaches through the Surface Pro partnership for a couple of years now.

Now Apple has its nose in the game and, on the surface, looks to have pitched a shutout.

HarryGlass

March 30, 2016, 9:32 pm

Is this a paid for article or just poor copy? It reads like a press release.

thevaliant x

April 2, 2016, 7:50 am

Another reason why I no longer follow MLB to any degree. It was a fun game to watch when the box scores were in the newspaper, the players acted with respect toward one another, the game and the fans, and cheating with drugs (and now technology) wasn't rampant. Rest in peace, MLB.

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