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LG shows off 18-inch flexible OLED tech for future roll-up TVs

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LG flexible display
LG flexible display

LG has once again shown off a new advancement in screen technology, with an 18-inch OLED display that’s flexible enough to be rolled up like a poster.

An advancement that could be a sign of we can expect in TVs of the future, LG’s latest flexible screen is an 18-inch OLED display.

It’s so flexible that you can roll it up to a radius of 3cm without destroying the thing, or even stopping it from displaying content.

With a resolution of 1,200 x 810 pixels, it’s not the sort of panel you're going to want to buy (or be able to) as a bedroom TV, but it is a great proof of future possibilities.

LG says it will be able to produce screens up to 50 inches in size using this same rollable screen technology.

That should come in handy for those of us who live in London and won’t be able to afford a flat larger than a shower cubicle in five years.

How come it is so flexible? The hard plastic normally used as the backing for OLED screens is replaced by a polymide film in this new LG 18-inch display, letting it flex while maintaining integrity.

The display is also translucent, giving it all sorts of home-bound applications, rather than just as a TV display.

This tech remains reassuring for those of us waiting to see OLED TVs make a return. After seeming like OLED was going to take over from LCD for high-end TVs a couple of years ago, most companies have sidelined OLED production in favour of cheap (and occasionally dirty) 4K LCDs.

Large OLED displays remain hard to produce, meaning that the cost has stayed sky-high.

LG remains one of the main proponents of OLED TVs, though, and its rather excellent LG 55EA980W is now available to buy for a mere four thousand pounds. The future may be expensive, but its black levels are to die for.

Next, read our best TVs round-up

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