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Ivy Bridge To Offer “20 percent more processor performance using 20 percent less average power."

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Ivy Bridge

Intel’s Kirk Skaugen, who is leading the company’s Ivy Bridge launch, has gone on record to say that Ivy Bridge will give “20 percent more processor performance using 20 percent less average power" compared to current-generation Sandy Bridge Core i3-i7 processors.

Considering we’re talking about the same impressive performance seen from chips inside the likes of Ultrabooks such as the Toshiba Satellite Z830 or tablets such as the Samsung Series 7 Slate 700T, an extra 20 percent thrown in while sucking less battery power is exciting stuff.

The one area where Intel’s current architecture is weakest is in the graphics department, with its integrated HD 3000 barely letting you play the latest 3D titles. This is also where Ivy Bridge's HD 4000 sees the greatest improvement over its predecessor, and if early benchmarks are anything to go by, we might expect up to 50 percent more GPU performance.
Ivy Bridge
How does Intel manage this while keeping power consumption so low? Not only is Ivy Bridge its first - and indeed the world’s first - 22nm product, it’s also the first to feature ‘3D transistors”. This last bit is what really ramps up the energy efficiency, and should allow Intel to finally compete with ARM (as found in Apple’s A5X and Nvidia’s Tegra 3, powering tablets such as the new iPad and Asus Eee Pad Transformer Prime) when it comes to performance per watt in the mobile space.

We would imagine the dual 20 percent advantage would only apply under certain usage scenarios, but even so it’s certainly whetted our appetites for what Ivy Bridge will bring to the table. Laptops and tablets/slates that perform better while lasting longer are nothing to sniff at, after all.

Via The BBC

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