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Intel Outlines Smartphone Plan As Ivy Bridge Delayed

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Intel Medfield Ivy Bridge

At Mobile World Congress 2012 in Barcelona, Intel’s CEO took to the stage to outline his company’s next step in its move into the low-power mobile market – however at the same time, news emerged that its Ivy Bridge chips have been delayed until June.

Paul Otellini unveiled the Lenovo K800 at CES in January as the first phone to be powered by the company’s Medfield platform of low-power Atom chips. At Mobile World Congress we’ve seen another phone from Orange which features the Atom chip, as well as a phone to be launched in India from manufacturer Lava.

The chip currently inside the Lenovo, Orange and Lava phones is the Z2460 which can hit clock speeds of 2GHz and features an Intel XMM 6260 HSPA radio. Up next will be the Z2580 which Intel claims will double the performance and will also bring LTE support thanks to the Intel XMM 7160 radio.

Intel Medfield Ivy Bridge

Looking further down the line, Otellini revealed that the company plans to introduce a “value smartphone” processor which may only clock in at 1GHZ, but will allow for Android devices to be sold for less than $150 (£95) unsubsidised.

While this is all good news for the company’s burgeoning mobile offering, things don’t seem to be going so well with other parts of the line-up. According to the Financial Times who spoke to Intel China chairman Sean Maloney, Intel’s next-generation Ivy Bridge processors will now not launch until June.

Initially pegged for an April launch, the delays have been caused by the new manufacturing process for the 22nm processors which use new 3D transistors. Ivy Bridge will bring much lower power consumption compared to the current Sandy Bridge chips but will also add significantly boosted integrated GPUs with some leaked benchmarks showing the performance boost to be up to 70 per cent faster.

Source: Intel and Financial Times

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