Gravity’s 3D supervisor says 3D ‘was rushed to market’

Hollywood might have hailed 3D as the be-all-and-end-all of blockbuster viewing, but shoddy execution has left many with a foul taste for the tech.

According to Chris Parks, stereoscopic supervisor for Gravity, however, this can be largely attributed to one simple issue – the fact that 3D was rushed into the mainstream.

“Because of the demand for 3D, the product was rushed to market, and that led to a lot of the problems,” he said speaking with TrustedReviews.

Although many have suffered disappointing experiences with 3D, the Gravity lead believes the demand for the technology is still there.

“I think the demand has shown to be there. You put a film out that’s marketed well and conceived well and the audience is there,” he told us.

What’s more, Parks reckons some films do give a ‘better experience’ in 3D than 2D, telling TrustedReviews: “My aim, always, in that final screening we do with the director before signing off on 3D, is for them to actually say ‘I prefer my film in 3D than in 2D.’”

“3D gives, by some measures, 400 per cent more information than 2D,” he continued.

Gravity was met with universal acclaim from critics, with its use of 3D receiving notable praise. Parks told us he thinks the space-epic is the best counter-argument to people who think of 3D as a bit of a buzzword.

“I do truly believe, and I know Alfonso [Cuarón, Gravity’s Director] truly believes, that watching Gravity in 3D gives much closer to the experience that he was trying to give than watching it in 2D,” Parks revealed.

The stereoscopic mastermind was also keen to snub the idea of 3D being perceived as a gimmick, revealing that he used 3D to tell story more than any other film he’d worked on so far.

“You tend to think of 3D as spectacular – stuff coming out of the screen,” he explained. “I think 3D works particularly well for communicating human emotion. I think 3D is about much more than the spectacle.

In spite of concerns that 3D is dying, Park described how the tech was still in its infancy, and there’s lots of room for improvement in the future.

“Working in 3D, you’ve almost got a blank canvas. There aren’t answers. People haven’t done enough with 3D. There are huge numbers of possibilities.”

He continued: “If you want to get into an area of film where you can make up your own rules, 3D is a very good place to start.”

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