Home » News » Software News » BlueStacks Launches Android App Player For Apple Mac

BlueStacks Launches Android App Player For Apple Mac

by | Go to comments

Share:
BlueStacks Android Mac
No Android? No problem. BlueStacks is working on enabling Mac users to play with some of the best that the ’droid platform has to offer

BlueStacks, the developer of software that enables Windows users to run Android apps, has launched an Apple version.

The company used the Google I/O developer event on June 27 to make its announcement, staged as a mock wedding between Android and Apple.

The Windows version was released in March and downloaded by 1 million users in just ten days. Not bad for a startup venture that’s still in the beta testing phase.

The Apple edition is an early alpha release, so it’s free (at least until its official release), but you may encounter bugs.

BlueStacks Android Mac

While there are a lot of cross platform apps and games that run on Android, Windows and Apple hardware, there are exceptions and the experience can vary wildly.

The benefit for desktop and laptop computer users is that they will be able to run a number of popular mobile utilities or games (like Angry Birds, Alchemy, Words With Friends, Fruit Ninja and Temple Run) on their machines.

The company also offers a Cloud Connect feature, which syncs your Android apps from a phone or tablet over to another device, including PCs and Macs with BlueStacks.

BlueStacks Cloud Connect
The App Player uses technology that BlueStacks calls Layercake to optimise graphics-heavy Android apps for standard PC processors, and it can run them in full screen if necessary.

The BlueStacks creators are working with original app developers to help make their apps run on the platform-shifting software. It gives app developers a potentially bigger user base while also saving time, as they don’t necessarily have to develop a whole new version to run on Windows or Mac.  

Asus recently signed a ‘pre-loading’ deal to bundle BlueStacks with 30 million of its Windows computers.

Via TechCrunch

Go to comments
comments powered by Disqus