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Airlines in the US no longer have to warn passengers about the Galaxy Note 7

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Note 7

If you're boarding a plane in the US, you'll no longer be warned about the Galaxy Note 7's explosive tendencies before take-off.

The Department of Transportation has lifted the requirement for airlines to warn passengers about the phablet being prohibited from flight.

In a press release, the Federal Aviation Administration said: "U.S. airlines would no longer be required to make a pre-boarding notification to passengers that the Samsung Galaxy Note7 phone is prohibited from transport on aircraft.

"The devices are still prohibited on both passenger and air cargo aircraft, but the DOT has lifted the requirement that the airlines make the specific pre-boarding notification."

Related: Note 7 review

Clearly, then, the phone is still banned from air transport, so the change only really affects airlines and passengers are still expected not to bring their Note 7 handset on board.

The change has been made, according to the FAA, “due to the high degree of public awareness of the ban since issuance of the emergency restriction/prohibition order, as well as the extensive efforts by Samsung and U.S. wireless providers to make all Note 7 users aware the phone is recalled and banned from transport on U.S. aircraft.”

Samsung has also issued a statement where it says it has managed to recover more than 93% of Note 7 handsets since it issues a global recall last year.

The company will reveal the results of its internal investigation into the Note 7's overheating problems at the end of January.

Before the recall, numerous reports of the Note 7 overheating emerged, with one handset catching fire on-board a Southwest Airlines plane.

The Department of Transportation issued its prohibition in the US on October 14 last year, designating the Galaxy Note7 as forbidden on aircraft.

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Let us know what you think of the FAA's decision in the comments.

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