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ThinkPad Netbook Specced Up - Not a Netbook

Gordon Kelly

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ThinkPad Netbook Specced Up - Not a Netbook

I'm still not convinced there should be a ThinkPad netbook, but given we've had a budget Ferrari laptop I guess no brand is off limits. Besides it turns out we don't have a ThinkPad netbook, by the skin of its teeth.

Liliputing has let the cat out of the bag with the partially leaked X100e and hit us with the news that it won't actually be a we-call-it-a-netbook-because-it-has-an-Atom-CPU-in-it with Lenovo having opted for a 1.6GHz AMD Neo. Consequently this is a rival to the increasingly popular Intel CULV sector which is probably a better thing. That means we get the usual 11.6in 1366 x 768 display, a multi-touch trackpad, up to 4GB RAM, a choice of HDDs up to 500GB and three or six cell batteries.

Integrated 3G and Bluetooth with be optional extras and Windows 7 Starter to Professional can be chosen. Interestingly the X100e will also be the first ThinkPad to sport an isolation keyboard which shows pretty much everyone has been converted to this format now.

Another surprise is the X100e will be paired with another model, the 'ThinkPad Edge', which we'd heard nothing of until now. Despite the swanky name, the Edge is essentially an enlarged X100e with a 13.3in display and a choice of faster AMD 1.6GHz Athlon Neo X2 and 1.6GHz Turion X2 CPUs.

I'm sure both will be high quality machines, though call me old fashioned because I believe if you dilute every premium brand you own there really isn't much point to having them in the first place. Expect everything to become official soon.

Link:

via Liliputing

Ryan131

November 20, 2009, 1:09 am

What's an isolation keyboard?

Helmore

November 20, 2009, 1:42 am

@Ryan - It's a special kind of keyboard that better isolates your hands from the heat emitted by the laptop and thus gives you cooler and less sweaty hands.





He means a chiclet style of keyboard as used on the Sony VAIO X505, which was one of the first laptops to use this style of keyboard.


http://www.trustedreviews.com/... <<-----Sony Vaio X505 review.


Most people think it was Apple who came with the idea to use it on a notebook though.





Wiki:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...

Helmore

November 20, 2009, 1:46 am

Oh sorry, my mistake. Too bad there is no edit function. The latter part of my previous post is a bit wrong though, as this laptop does not have a chiclet style keyboard. The keyboard on this notebook simply has keys that have a more apparent spacing between them and are actually 'open' underneath (i.e. no downward facing slopes on the sides of the keys).

Gordon394

November 20, 2009, 7:10 am

@Helmore - Sony came up with isolation keyboard, Apple copied it ;)

Tony Walker

November 20, 2009, 7:53 am

Whilst I haven't been able to check the latest crop of Thinkpad keyboards, I assume they are still the best, despite Lenovo's own lappies having rubbish keyboards.





Earlier today (oops, yesterday, have just looked at clock) I think I stumbled into the new pretender for the "King Of Laptop Keyboards" crown. Namely the Acer FineTip keyboard. As present on the One 751, the 1410, the 1810TZ, and others, the quality and feel is quite staggering.





I was so impressed, I nearly walked out of PC World with a red 1810TZ under my arm.

Steve

November 20, 2009, 2:20 pm

@ Gordon





Actually, shouldn't the ZX81 be credited with using the isolation keyboard first? ;-)





http://upload.wikimedia.org/wi...

Andy0d2

November 21, 2009, 1:39 am

meh. Just keep us posted about the acer 1820P tablet. I think that could be the biggest selling 'netbook' (ultraportable), if priced right, for the first half of next year.

Xiphias

November 21, 2009, 3:27 am

@Steve: Well, the ZX Spectrum at least.





It's a shame these Thinkpad Notebooks are so big, I'd prefer a proper 9" one. I wonder how they'll be priced and what sort of quality they'll be. £500 and X300 quality would be nice, but may be pushing it at bit at 12-13"

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