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Sky Anytime Evolves Into iTunes Rival

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Time was Sky's Anytime service was little more than a fiddly, DRM-infested, subscriber exclusive piece of limp multimedia fluff (no, I didn't like it) - but now it has serious potential...

The broadcaster has this week unveiled a major makeover to its once-laughable offering moving it from a single PC restricted download to a flexible browser based system, expanding it to non-Sky subscribers and offering its vast array of content on a download-to-own basis. In a sentence, it's iTunes but with Sky programming.

Consequently this means a number of pluses and minuses in comparison to the Apple uber-creation. For a start this is very much a video rather than music focused approach with 'Movies', 'Entertainment', 'Documentaries', 'Sport' and 'Life & Culture' categories delivering everything from the latest blockbusters and TV shows to Premier League Highlights and Sky's own programmes.

If you're a subscriber most of this content is free though download-to-own TV shows cost between £1.50 and £1. Non-subscribers on the other hand pay £2 per TV episode and pay £5pm to view sports highlights including clips from the EPL.

Interestingly, the revamped Sky Anytime also enables Sky+ and Sky HD owners to schedule their home systems to record content - great if you're stuck at Auntie Ethel's for Christmas lunch and forced into watching the Queen's speech again.

Sadly Mac and Linux users are once more left out of the equation (the BBC iPlayer and Channel 4's 4oD also ignore them) but for Windows victims this savvy new system is live now.

Link:
Sky Anytime

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