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Samsung Unveils P200 12.1in Ultra Portable Notebook

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Samsung has always been adept at producing very capable portable notebooks at aggressive prices, with both the Q35 and Q45 perfect examples of this. And, having performed well in the consumer market, Samsung has gone away and tweaked the formula to target business users as well.

The result is the P200, a more reserved version of the excellent Q45 that shuns the consumer friendly glossy finish in favour of something more durable. It weighs in at a perfectly portable 1.89kg, with bog standard ATI Radeon Xpress 1250 integrated graphics, Bluetooth 2.0 EDR, Atheros Super G Wireless, 10/100 Ethernet and the latest Intel processor offerings. Indeed, judging by the lack of Gigabit Ethernet and Wireless-N, it would appear this really is just a Q45 in new clothes.

There are some changes, though, most notably on the outside where the aforementioned glossy finish has been replaced by what Samsung is calling the Protect-o-SoftGrip lid. Essentially it's a rubberised surface that's meant to help protect the machine from the wear and tear encountered on the road. As if this weren't enough the P200 also sports a Protect-o-Edge casing, though what a Protect-o-Edge casing actually is isn't entirely clear...

Amazingly, Samsung is also making a selling point an anti-bacterial coating on the keyboard, which will come as a relief to those concerned about catching Bird-Flu or a nasty cough, though it won't protect you from anything else you might pick up while enjoying yourself abroad.

Dodgy marketing slogans asides it looks like a pretty solid machine, having got hold of one briefly the rubberised lid is a nice addition and with UK pricing mooted at £599 for a 2.0GHz T7250 and 2GB RAM, it certainly offers a lot of value for money. Moreover, as Hounsoo Kim, Executive Vice President of the Computer System Division at Samsung Electronics pointed out, the P200 "moves beyond the limitations inherent in Ultra Portable Notebooks to provide the perfect combination of performance, portability and reliability to let users do more with less" - so it's bound to be good.

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