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Samsung Officially Launches NX10 'Hybrid DSLR'

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Samsung has taken the best part of a year to bring this concept to market, but it has now formally announced the 'NX10'.

Dubbed a 'Hybrid DSLR', the NX10 is likely to be a controversial character since it takes on the same theme as Micro Four Thirds: reduced size body thanks to scrapping the single lens reflex system, but isn't actually compatible with it. Erm, cheers Samsung.

Instead the NX10 remains small (121.9 x 86.3 x 40.6mm, body only), though actually slightly larger than the Micro Four Thirds models we have seen to date. On the upside, however, Samsung has pulled the stops out with a 14.6MP APS-C CMOS sensor, 100 - 3200 ISO, an electronic viewfinder, built in pop-up flash and 3in OLED display. Its new DRIMe II Pro engine powers the show and there's 720p High Definition video recording with HDMI output.
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"The new Samsung NX10 marks the start of the next generation of cameras," said Samsung digital imaging CEO SJ Park. "The large sensor and the ultra fast auto focus give consumers the quality they demand as well as the compactness they want in one exceptional package."

While I agree in general with Park's analysis, I'm not convinced inventing a new proprietary system is the way to achieve it. The tech industry has flourished when industry standards are widely adopted and floundered when it has become fractured. I'd argue Micro Four Thirds needs support right now, not competition. Instead Samsung is treading a worrying and increasingly Sony-esque path at present and the NX system comes hot on the heels of its equally confusing bada smartphone platform. Bada is another in-house project that is looking to divide a sector which has recently flourished thanks to greater stability.

An ambiguous 'spring 2010' release timeframe has been placed on the NX10 and I have to admit, I'm not holding my breath...

Link:
Press Release via engadget

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