Home / News / Desktop PC News / Packard Bell Refreshes imedia Desktops

Packard Bell Refreshes imedia Desktops

by

Packard Bell Refreshes imedia Desktops

The market for Packard Bell's refreshed imedia range isn't hard to determine. Let's face it, buying a pre-built computer might not have the cache that a home-built system can draw, but it's a damn sight easier to just buy one. Plus, with the way prices are falling on pre-assembled systems, they can hardly be called bad value considering the time and effort saved.

The imedia line-up starts from £299 and rises upwards from there depending on the configuration. Both Intel Core 2 Quad and Phenom II X4 CPUs are available, up to 8GB of RAM can be fitted and storage options topping out at 1TB of capacity. Graphics can be upgraded from the default integrated chipset to a more capable nVidia GeForce GT230. Wi-Fi and a DVB-T tuner are also optional upgrades.

The case, which is apparently 60 per cent of "full-sized" features an array of front-mounted card readers, in addition to two of the six available USB ports. A recessed area on top of the system is provided for storage of external storage devices, MP3 players and the like while connected to the system.

Okay, so would-be Crysis players aren't going to find a solution in the imedia range, but for general office applications and most multimedia there should be more than enough power on tap.

Press Release (PDF).

b166er

July 3, 2009, 6:07 pm

OK, all well and good, but is it quiet? This is so often overlooked. When building your own PC, you can make it silent. How about a Top Ten quiet off-the-shelf computers article?

MarioM

July 3, 2009, 6:41 pm

I totally agree with b166er - PCs at the moment are all pretty much similar and commodity items, so the noise level and power consumption are becoming more important that the 0.1 extra frame in Crysis. I would love to see noise levels on each PC, NAS and laptop review - i.e. things with fans that might run most of the time.

Chocoa

July 3, 2009, 7:42 pm

Agree too. Whilst you may get a cheaper pc and a warranty but given how many builders go to the wall this is of dubious benefit these days. - You get a system built to a price with, I would say, little regard to quality of the components and the end use you may want. Building your own allows to to EXACTLY specify end use and hence component choice.





I guess buyers of these systems "just want a cheap pc" - and will doubtless get what they buy ;-)

Tony Walker

July 4, 2009, 6:48 am

Agree with all the three comments.





I still build my owm desktops so I can get the exact specification I want, using components from the manufacturers I want.





Also some manufacturers are still wont to rip us off for slight increases in HDD space or memory so we can avoid that and reduce cost disparity.





My current i920/GTX285 system is whispering along beside me as I type this.

comments powered by Disqus