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Nexus One To Get Gingerbread Within Weeks

David Gilbert

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Nexus One To Get Gingerbread Within Weeks

With the news coming out yesterday that Google's Nexus S was delayed by two days in the UK and won’t be in the shops until tomorrow (December 22), it will come as more welcome news that its first ever handset, the Nexus One will be getting a Gingerbread update “in the coming weeks.”

The information was released on the Twitter feed of @googlenexus last night stating: “The Gingerbread OTA for Nexus One will happen in the coming weeks. Just sit tight.” It will no doubt come as great news for Nexus One owners who have been sitting nervously staring at their screens since the Nexus S was launched a couple of weeks ago running Gingerbread.

This is the first official word from Google that the Nexus One will be getting the update. Despite the Nexus One being pulled from shelves six months after it went on sale, it continues to be one of the best performing Android phones. This is partly down to it running a pure version of Android and updating to a clean version of Gingerbread will no doubt make the most of the upgrade – especially when compared to other phones running slightly altered versions of the OS.

Runadumb

December 21, 2010, 5:08 pm

I have been "Checking in" a few times a day for a week now. Haha maybe I should just do it every other day now...well for the next week, then check in 20 times a day ;)

HarryGlass

December 21, 2010, 5:48 pm

You'd think (as the nice TR graphic shows) Google could manage to give us all some Gingerbread for Xmas. It does seem to be a flaw of Android that prevents them from rolling it out as soon as it's ready (at least to non-branded phones), when Apple & Microsoft seem to manage fine.





Still hope xda-devs can serve up some tasty Gingerbread where Google are keeping me hungry.

CodeMonkey

December 21, 2010, 7:05 pm

Having rushed to grab leaked build after leaked build for Froyo, I'm quite happy to wait for the official OTA for my N1. There's a lot to be said for waiting, principally because more apps will have been reworked to be Gingerbread ready by the time the official release is out.

rav

December 21, 2010, 8:08 pm

@HK


Given that MS/Apple are dealing with very limited hardware configs it must be a much smaller task to get updates out to all phones. As someone who would always buy a higher end phone I can see the attraction of a minimum spec but then you'd lose the bargains like the Oragne San Francisco which really do open up smartphones to the masses.





This is then compounded by Google iterating every four or five months. It must make it exponentially harder for manufacturers to keep up compared to the annual updates that Apple stick to.





Persionally I don't think I'll have to wait to long for the solid Desire ports to hit once the official Nexus update is released.

Aidan5ea

December 21, 2010, 9:16 pm

I'm running Oxygen v2.0 RC1 (Gingerbread) on my Desire and it's excellent. Quick, lightweight, stable... so far!

HarryGlass

December 21, 2010, 9:29 pm

@rav: Well Apple yes, but MS did ok with WinMo 6.5 with a wide range of devices and by the sounds of it have a strong update system in place for 7, limited hardware at this stage aside. Don't get me wrong, there's a lot to like about Android, but there still remains some areas where they need to put in a bit of work to make things easier for users. Things that really should have been built in from the get go. Android is still a bit of a hacker/developer phone and not ready for mainstream like the iPhone or even WP7 (which will lacking things does what most consummers will demand of it) without requiring any dipping into Linux. There "quick" iterations should be much easier for manufacturers to incorporate, and a lot more modular than they are already. If I can for instance install the market.apk or keyboard.apk to get Gingerbread on my phone, then such updates should come through the market in the same way Gmail is now.

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