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Intel: 32nm Development Complete

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Intel: 32nm Development Complete

Having got over the excitement of Core i7 (Nehalem), it's clearly time to start thinking about the next 'tick' in Intel's development cycle. That tick is a move from the current 45nm manufacturing process introduced with Penryn to 32nm, the development cycle of which Intel has announced the completion of.

That means that we should see 32nm (codenamed Westmere for the interested) CPUs in Q4 2009, right on schedule with Intel's predictions. Intel plans to serve up a plethora of information about its 32nm process tech at the International Electron Devices meeting (IEDM) next week.

I, for one, cannot wait to hear Intel's development team " describe a logic technology that incorporates second-generation high-k + metal gate technology, 193nm immersion lithography for critical patterning layers and enhanced transistor strain techniques." Daunting terminology aside, performance and energy efficiency improvements which, according to Intel, means "Intel's manufacturing process has the highest transistor performance and the highest transistor density of any reported 32nm technology in the industry."

The end result of 32nm for consumers should be cooler, cheaper, faster and less power hungry processors. Hardly to be sniffed at.

Next stop? 22nm of course!

Link:

Intel.

Jmac

December 11, 2008, 4:07 pm

Excellent news. I always go for the "tick" CPUs over the "tock" ones - by the time the die-shrink for the tick comes along the architecture has generally been through a few steppings and optimisations, you avoid the early adopter price of buying into a new architecture, software has had a chance to be developed which takes advantage of optimisations in the architecture over previous architectures so you really get to see the benefits, and you should get power and heat savings due to the smaller process. Win-win-win-win-win

Amir

December 11, 2008, 6:52 pm

smart choice.


nothing lasts in the present

Pbryanw

December 11, 2008, 8:41 pm

Well put Amir, and a very Buddhist philosophy (impermanence that is)





Anyway, it doesn't seem that long ago we were looking forward to 45nm processors (is 42nm a mistake?) so it seems that nothing waits for technology.

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