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HDCP has been Cracked Admits Intel

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HDCP has been Cracked Admits Intel

Intel has confirmed that HDCP, the encryption used to protect Blu-ray, has been cracked.

Earlier this week, the High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) master key was posted onto an internet forum, and Intel has admitted that it could be used to create illegal keys.

HDCP is a digital system that creates a key that all devices must recognise when connected together in order to play back Blu-ray or other HD content at full resolution. The technology was created by Intel and licenced to all HDTV, set-top box and Blu-ray manufacturers.

Speaking to FoxNews.com Intel spokesman Tom Waldrop admitted that the code has been cracked. "It does appear to be a master key," he said. "What we have confirmed through testing is that you can derive keys for devices from this published material that do work with the keys produced by our security technology.”

However, once you have this key, you’ll need to be pretty handy with a screwdriver if you want to do anything with it, as you’d need to build it into silicon to be able to make use of it and then put it in a device. Doing it just in software would be too slow Waldrop believes, at least at the moment – though chips that are good at doing things like this, from say, Intel, do tend to get faster quite quickly.

In the meantime though, it would preclude being able to pop a Blu-ray disc in your machine and rip it to your hard drive, as was possible once DVD Jon cracked the DeCSS encryption code used for DVD.

It means though that Intel and the rest of the industry must face up to cheap Blu-ray players and displays coming out of Chinese factories that bypass HDCP. Waldrop said that Intel would take action if this came to fruition.

"We will use the appropriate remedies to address the issue, where we choose to," Waldrop said.

Via: Foxnews.com.

ChaosDefinesOrder

September 17, 2010, 6:30 pm

How come nowhere reporting on this news has mentioned that with HDCP cracked you can now watch your *legally purchased* Blu-Rays on any screen you like?





Why does it have to be focussed on "now everyone can crack and rip their copies"? Remember that a 1080p with DTS master of a movie is pushing 80GB, who would be arsed to download that pirated?





Granted they're relatively rare nowadays, but there are some "high resolution" monitors that are not HDCP compliant and despite having the screen quality and resolution are not able to watch Blu-Ray content just because they're missing the HDCP...

piesforyou

September 17, 2010, 6:45 pm

"It means though that Intel and the rest of the industry must face up to cheap Blu-ray players and dispalys coming out of Chinese factories"





So... the only thing keeping blu-ray players so expensive is the license for the copy protection? Well that sucks.

Keithe6e

September 17, 2010, 7:41 pm

'In the meantime though, it would preclude being able to pop a Blu-ray disc in your machine and rip it to your hard drive,'





Am I missing something, that's been possible for ages now with AnyDVD HD.





Having the MasterKey available makes it possible to create BlueRay disks that have Copy Protection on them, the other way round doesn't require the MasterKey.

Digital Fury

September 17, 2010, 7:49 pm

"In the meantime though, it would preclude being able to pop a Blu-ray disc in your machine and rip it to your hard drive, as was possible once DVD Jon cracked the DeCSS encryption code used for DVD."





AnyDVD HD does this already.

Jmac

September 17, 2010, 7:50 pm

First of all, HDCP stands for high-bandwidth digital content protection, not high definition content protection. Secondly, typo in the last para - reads "DHCP" not "HDCP".





Thirdly, you state "In the meantime though, it would preclude being able to pop a Blu-ray disc in your machine and rip it to your hard drive, as was possible once DVD Jon cracked the DeCSS encryption code used for DVD."





This is misleading. Ripping a Blu-Ray disc would not entail breaking HDCP - you would want to break AACS and BD+, which are the protections on the compressed content on the disc. HDCP is applied to the uncompressed stream between player and screen. I believe software such as Slysoft's AnyDVD HD has already broken AACS and BD+, though there is a bit of cat-and-mouse with content producers revoking compromised keys and changing the software run on the BD+ virtual machine to try to defeat hacks. I'll confess I'm not fully up to speed with the current status of this.





What's news here is not that someone has broken HDCP (which was shown to be vulnerable as early as 2001 - http://www.cs.rice.edu/~scrosb..., but that a master key has been leaked which is effectively a permanent breaking of the technology - the master key can be used to create unlimited valid keys, and the master key can't be revoked without irreparably breaking the millions of HDCP enabled devices already in circulation.





Anyway, the fact that a software solution would be slower than realtime wouldn't preclude it from ripping a disc slower than realtime. All it would do is prevent a software hack from removing HDCP from a data stream in realtime to use with a display without HDCP.





Also, DeCSS was not the encryption code - the code was CSS (content scrambling system); DeCSS was DVD Jon's hack to break CSS.





Breaking HDCP is a good thing. It will drive down the cost of Blu-Ray and other HD technology by eliminating a licence fee payable for unnecessary and ineffective DRM which only serves to infuriate users of perfectly serviceable non-HDCP 1080p displays rendered obsolete by an artificial impediment to fair use of legally purchased content.

Manni

September 17, 2010, 8:05 pm

@ChaosDefinesOrder


The BD media limit is 50Gb (dual sided), so it's difficult to find many movies taking 80Gb...


The focus on "now everyone can crack and rip their copies" is entirely wrong, because sadly full quality rips (20gb or more) of blurays have been widely available for years (since ACSS protection got cracked), and are indeed downloaded by more people than you think despite the time it takes to do so, the space required to store them (and of course the fact that it is illegal).


The HDCP protection is a joke. Yes, there are some situations where you would want to play a bluray on an old monitor, but that's very marginal unless you want to mass produce illegal blurays for reselling and need to connect a player to a multi-burner.


Hopefully it's not the case...

Nik Bates

September 17, 2010, 11:31 pm

A few years ago i purcashed a 27" Thompson Lcd Tv for £700 way before lcd became mainstream and way before hdmi was the preferred input and it came with only a Dvi and guess what it wasn't HDCP compliant so this will be good news to me, cheap Blu ray player for the bedroom Yes please.

Enigma

September 17, 2010, 11:41 pm

The people in the AV and content production industries aren't very bright! When are they going to learn that what can be made can be 'broken'? It's seems rather easily!!





The amount of money and effort that has firstly gone into all the DRM R&D and then into setting up production must surely be greater than the loss to piracy?





After all the AV and content production industries survived the VHS and and audio cassette era.





So you can stop the IDIOTS making CAM copies at the cinemas - they have to be idiots as I cannot see any value seeing such a poor copy of the original - but what of CAMing at home?





Judging by the people like me making the extra effort and at extra cost to see sell-out movies like Avatar at BFI's IMAX Waterloo I cannot see how they are loosing any significant amount of money to piracy? Indeed the figures prove it. Just make GOOD movies and you will make money.





Even films like Water (the Kevin Costner 'flop') has since reportedly raked in good money.

hankb6d

September 18, 2010, 12:57 am

Maybe Sony will get some Hank cash after all.

PGrGr

September 21, 2010, 4:31 pm

In your linked article, written in Oct 06, you wrote:





"Interestingly, in dialogues I have had with many rival iPod companies it is a common view that the exclusivity of iTunes is the key component in the player&#8217s continued market dominance. We may be about to find out whether that argument holds true&#8230"





I guess that four years later, with ipods still dominant, that particular piece of hacking hasn't had the expected effect!

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