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Google Dismisses App Stores & Viruses

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Will Cloud computing fix everything?

That seems to be the opinion being hammered home by Google at present as it has now proclaimed both new kid on the block the App Store and old foe viruses will fall by the wayside when it takes off.

Speaking on the subject of App Stores to the FT, Google engineering VP Vic Gundotra (pictured) explained: "What we clearly see happening is a move to incredibly powerful browsers. Many, many applications can be delivered through the browser and what that does for our costs is stunning. We believe the Web has won and over the next several years, the browser, for economic reasons almost, will become the platform that matters and certainly that's where Google is investing."

He added that he believes Apple overlord Steve Jobs, whose company presides over by far the largest App store agrees with him, saying "Build for the web" was Jobs' message when the iPhone was launched. Gundotra adds that timing was not right then but "the rate of innovation {over the last year} in the browser is surprising. I think Steve really did understand that, over the long term, it would be the web and I think that's how things will play out."

Not content with shooting down App Stores, Google engineering director Linus Upson told new scientist that the Cloud will also effectively end viruses. "We are completely redesigning the underlying security architecture of the {Google} OS so users don't have to deal with viruses, malware and security updates. It should just work." This concept is a well trodden one: that if you eliminate the need for downloadable updates the reaction time will cut drastically, as will the threat itself if the Cloud means little is actually stored directly on a user's SSD/HDD.

Yes, there is still some way to go before Cloud computing truly takes off - even after Chrome OS launches in 2010 - but resistance can be reduced if the revamped Google Docs and Web Office get things right, while the heavily reduced costs should sway many. Add to that platform neutral applications and a virus free environment and the tide may just turn, whatever Steve Ballmer says...

Links:
via The FT
via New Scientist

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