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Death Knell Sounds For Dell Adamo

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The Dell Adamo was heralded as a MacBook Air killer when launched at CES in 2009. Sadly we get news today that rather than putting the MacBook Air out to pasture, Dell has discontinued the Adamo line altogether.

The Adamo is dead, long live the Adamo. That is what we suspect those in love with Dell’s ultra thin, high-performace, high-cost notebooks will be shouting today. The Adamo launched amid a flurry of media attention back in 2009 and was seen then as a possible successor to the MacBook Air. Sleek unibody design, SSDs as standard and a lack of an internal optical drive made the Adamo stand out from its competitors. It’s launch prices of £1,649 and £2,249 made it somewhat different from other Dell offerings at the time too of course.
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Over the past few months Dell has slashed the premium price point significantly and was offering the Adamo at almost a third of its launch price. However this was not a sign that it would be competing with the MacBook on price as well as style, but an attempt to get rid of its stock in double-quick time. Today the Dell website says the Adamo series is no longer available and asks those looking to buy one would they like to have a look at its performance XPS laptops instead.

However those of you still eager to get your hands on an Adamo before they go silently into the technology night can still get refurbished models at knock down prices on the Dell website. As the MacBook Air continues to dominate this sector of the market, it seems as if no one is currently capable of producing a viable alternative which can compete on price as well as style and substance. Samsung is the latest to try with it’s recently revealed ZX310 9 Series. We will have to wait and see how it gets on.

For Dell's part, sources have told CNET that the manufacturer is working on a newly designed laptop range which will fall into one of Dell's existing consumer brands.

Source: CNET

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