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LG Electronics

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Also on show was 55in LCD TV with an even more impressive 1080p HD resolution. This screen also has a built-in digital tuner, although it doesn’t sport the hard disk recorder. I was surprised at how bright and vibrant this LCD screen was, especially when compared to the plasma model – it looks like the future of LCD TVs is bright.

Despite the fact that LG’s LCD TV produced a picture almost as bright and vibrant as its plasma set, LG is committed to plasma technology. LG was keen to talk about its Double Life technology, which effectively doubles the lifetime of a plasma panel from an average of 30,000 hours to 60,000 hours. LG has also implemented four different technologies into its plasma sets to eradicate the burn-in problem that has traditionally plagued plasma screens.

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LG threw an interesting statistic out into the crowd. It stated that research has shown that 40 per cent of DVD recorders are returned to shops by customers in North America. LG cites the confusing format situation for this statistic, asserting that consumers were buying players and then finding that the media they bought didn’t work, resulting in frustration and eventual return of the recorder.

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Of course LG had the answer to this worrying statistic (I hate statistics, don’t you?) in the form of its Super-Multi DVD recorder. This is a consumer video recorder using the same technology as LG’s Super-Multi PC drives. This device will write to DVD+R/RW, DVD-R/RW and DVD-RAM discs, meaning that a consumer can buy any media and be sure that it will work in the recorder. LG feels that simplicity is the key to the success of consumer technology – a feeling that’s being reflected by many of its competitors.

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