Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

The P5235’s navigational software offers most of the features you would expect of device above the budget level, although the interface is a little different to most of the mainstream manufacturers. Along the top of the main menu can be found single-click links to the home location you set, your most recent destination, and a list of other recent destinations, which is very convenient. Beneath this lie the usual options for entering an address or searching for a Point of Interest.

We found the address database contained all our test locations, including villages listed as ‘near’ a major town by the postal service. You can also now search for a full seven-digit postcode – something which wasn’t available in the E3410 we tested a couple of years ago. However, you can’t specify a house number, so will be guided to the centre of the postcode in question. There is also no general keyword search for the address database, so you will need to know the correct city, town or village for your destination. But you can enter exact latitude and longitude coordinates as degrees or decimal notation.

The POI database is a little more flexible. We like the category interface, which arranges these two abreast so you don’t need to scroll through so many pages to find the one you’re after. You can also search the database within a given city, near your current location, along your route, or at the destination. But you can’t search the entire database, as you can now with Mio Navman’s Spirit software. The POI listings also include phone numbers for some locations.

There’s a route planner, so you can add specific waypoints to your itinerary. As we mentioned earlier, the P5235 has RDS-TMC traffic update reception built in, and the aerial is a separate wire rather than built into the car power adapter, so you can use this when the sat-nav is battery powered. We found the RDS-TMC updates displayed their usual intermittency, as with most other devices we have tested. So the traffic information available is useful, but not completely infallible.

Previous page
Next page
comments powered by Disqus