Summary

Our Score

6/10

Review Price free/subscription

Magellan Maestro 4245 Sat-Nav - Magellan Maestro 4245

The list goes on. Last-minute voice instructions are delivered a touch too late, and often don't tally with what's on screen, leading to confusion at some junctions. For turnings that are close together, instructions aren't linked together, and the second instruction often isn't delivered at all. The Maestro doesn't make the most of its useful split-screen next-turning mode either - as you approach a junction, the icon disappears at the critical moment, leaving you desperately trying to decipher the rather unclear 3D map view.
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Even its voice control isn't well thought out. When I'd finally worked out how to activate this (there's no reference to this in the in-box paper manual, but it turns out you have to yell 'voice mode' at it), the only useful application for it is in manually rerouting around a roadblock or traffic jam. Admittedly this worked well, but you can't enter street addresses and you can't check traffic status, which is frustrating to say the least.

But worse than all of this, is the awful speaker. It's too quiet and it distorts at maximum volume, making it difficult to hear instructions clearly when there's just a modicum of cabin noise. I found myself missing junctions - and almost missing out on important traffic information updates, just because a rather cheap corner had been cut. This is unforgivable in a top-of-the-range, dedicated sat-nav device.

Verdict

Perhaps if the Maestro 4245 had these problems and cost under £130 I'd be willing to grudgingly recommend it to sat-nav cheapskates. But the unfortunate truth is that this sat-nav device's high-end feature set is accompanied by an equally high-end price. And at a cost of £215 I can't advise anyone buys it over TomTom's much more capable XL Traffic Europe 22.

Scores In Detail

Value
4/10
Features
8/10

Our Score

6/10
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