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Fujifilm X10: Sample Images - ISO Performance

Audley Jarvis

By Audley Jarvis

Reviewed:

Awards

  • Recommended by TR
Fujifilm X10

Summary

Our Score:

9

100

ISO 100 offers sharp edges, good detail in shadow areas and is free of noise.

200

ISO 200 shows no visible difference from ISO 100

400

ISO 400 is still free of noise with very good shadow detail.

800

Whereas many compacts start to become unstuck at ISO 800, the X10 is still producing clear shots.

1600

At ISO 1600 shadow detail begins to soften as the X10's noise-reduction processing kicks in.

3200

At ISO 3200 the image has become noticeably softer, but the X10 can still produce usable images which is hugely impressive for a camera of this size.

6400

ISO 6400 is where things start to really break down.

12800

ISO 12800 isn't somewhere you want to go if you can possibly help it.

Fuji X10 1600

A real-life example of a perfectly usable shot taken at ISO 1600. Click to expand to actual size.

Fuji X10 3200

And the same image once more, this time with the X10 set to ISO 3200. Again, click to view at actual size.

Emin

May 20, 2012, 6:29 am

Firstly this review claims the sensor is a backlit CMOS well I'm not convinced. I have heard that a modified sensor has replaced the original which had white disc problem. However if you look at the FujiFilm X10 sensor on their website it has the sensor's silicon wafer wiring facing this is as far as I know on the top of a wafer so the light is falling on the front not the back in their photo please check your facts they make no mention to 'backlit'
This camera I have tried for a few minutes in a local camera shop as it was closing. I was able to work out how to manually focus from looking at the buttons and trying all the adjustment knobs rings etc so I would say fairly intuitive but not what is wanted such as several rings on the lens to control manual focus apature and zoom. What I didn't like was a lack of EVF - information in the view finder. If it is to resemble a film camera then my cheap Practica BX film camera shows me the Apature and suggested shutter speed and focus in the view finder I am thinking twice for the lack of these. I don't find going back to the funtionality of my Leica 1A view finder an advancement worth this price tag. Manual everything yes please retro looks and perfect size great. Would I buy one, well its the nearest thing I have seen so far as it does everything I want but to save money perhaps loosing the LCD and keeping the EVF instead would give me what I need. I don't need to review on screen and I don't need lots of menus I just want a camera that takes film like photos without the delay and cost and waste of film.

Ken Johnson

January 11, 2013, 11:43 am

This review needs updating, I have had my X-10 for over 6 months and the updated sensor has never produced "ugly white discs" that you have listed as a Con.
I have a Nikon DSLR, a Panasonic GF1 and the X-10. I choose to carry the X-10 everywhere, it is a solid, well made camera, image quality is excellent and the camera is fun to use. People always admire the retro styling too!
As far as I am concerned there are no downsides to this camera.

PC1512

May 13, 2015, 5:00 pm

You're right, it's not a backlit sensor, although arguably the special low-light abilities of the EXR arrangement make up for that.

PC1512

May 13, 2015, 5:15 pm

I picked up a used X10 a few months ago - the model is more than three years old now - and I just love this camera to bits. I have a decent Canon DSLR that takes technically much better pictures with its APS-C sensor and more reliable phase-detect autofocus, but it's nothing like as fun to use and the pictures from the Fuji have a certain quality that just elevates them. Shooting this camera at 6MP with the dynamic range mode set to DR400 gives you the same hardware-based enhanced DR as the (all automatic) EXR mode, and the results are often beautiful. It is easily the most "film like" digital camera I've ever come across, not just in looks and handling but in the images straight from the camera as well.

After this review was written, Fuji actually redesigned the sensor and fixed the "orb" problem altogether, offering a free replacement sensor to all affected cameras. My particular camera is a late serial number built after this redesign, so I've never had to worry about this issue. It's a shame that the X10 became synonymous with orbs since it's such a fantastic camera; the replacement X20 ditched the EXR sensor and its clever DR and low iso tricks altogether for a slightly more conventional x-trans design, and although its images are a touch sharper (due to ditching the AA filter) its jpegs actually aren't as good in capturing DR or dealing with ISO noise. All of which leaves the X10 as something of a classic, and a camera I'd currently choose over pretty much anything.

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