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Acer Aspire Z3-700



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User Score:

The Acer Aspire Z3 is an odd device. On the surface it looks like a desktop computer, but it’s actually far more interesting.

Tucked inside the svelte body is a battery that Acer says should last for five hours. So, in fact, it’s more a gigantic tablet with a 17.3in FHD screen.

Acer is positioning the Z3-700 as an all-in-one, but a model that isn’t confined to a desk. You could move it downstairs to show off some pictures, or hand it over to the kids to watch a film without having to unplug it or mess about with wires.

Another suggested scenario is to use it in a cab on the way to work – a little ridiculous, maybe?.

Related: Best tablets 2015

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On the rear of the Z3-700 are two kickstands to keep the PC upright. While they stay in position well, they're a little flimsy.

Note that both will need to be in position for the Z3-700 to stand upright. With only one in place, the unit will just fall over – as I found out first hand.

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Acer’s claim of five-hours' battery life seems impressive, especially when you consider that this device isn’t exactly thick at 15.6mm. However, that battery life is most likely achieved through the use of less power-hungry internals – either an Intel Pentium or Celeron processor, depending on where you buy it from.

Keeping that processor company is up to 8GB DDR3 RAM, Intel HD graphics and a bevy of internal storage options ranging from a 32GB SSD to a 500GB HDD.

Even though the specs may not jump off the page, I found the Aspire Z3-700 to be a capable machine. It loaded web pages quickly and didn’t judder when scrolling through image-heavy sites.

The 17.3in, 1080p IPS panel offers detailed, sharp and colourful images. Viewing angles are pretty impressive, too – although I’ll have to spend much longer with it to come to a full conclusion.

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In terms of connectivity, there's a couple of USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, headphone jack, volume rocker and microSD card slot on one side, while on the other sits a holder for a stylus. Not that one is included, mind you.

Acer says it has worked directly with Microsoft to ensure that the Aspire Z3-700 is optimised for Windows 10. Take the dual-digital microphones, for example. These mics use digital signal processing to cancel out background noise and improve speech accuracy. This means that using Cortana in noisy environments won't be a problem.

Early Verdict

I remain unconvinced by all of Acer's usage scenarios for the Aspire Z3-700, but I'm charmed by it nonetheless.

The idea of setting down a sizeable screen without having to worry about plugging it in is intriguing, and with prices starting from €599 (about £450) when it ships later in year, this capability comes at an attractive price too.


October 13, 2015, 2:36 am

What a shame it is hobbled by low power CPUs. If this came with Core i7 and Iris Pro graphics, it could be perfect for a lot of graphic designers. Even if that meant shorter battery life, a device like this would still be perfect for office work, where you could easily carry it into a meeting for a couple of hours, then put it back on charge at your desk and keep working.


October 13, 2015, 1:01 pm

The Dell XPS 18 has been doing this for how many years? At least 3. I've got one with Core i7 and so far it has been a fab machine. Battery life of 3-4 hours watching videos wich is enough for me watching Netflix in the kitchen.

Terry Proveau

October 13, 2015, 3:46 pm

I have the Asus PT-2000 with Core i5 and it does 5 hours on battery. It has a much better kick stand than this Acer and it has HDMI in! Yes you read that correctly! It doubles as a 19.5 inch monitor with HDMI input!
Came with 1 terabyte hard drive nice carry handle and optional Nvidia 820m graphics. Also has a fold out carry handle and it a bit on the heavy side being a 19.5 inch IPS screen. Came with wireless keyboard and mouse and Windows 8.1 that upgrades to Windows 10 without issues. Price was very good too as it is a 2014 model. Purchased at factory direct here in ontario.


October 14, 2015, 1:47 pm

A 6W Pentium N3700 for the AIO is just so obsolete in this present day! What was Acer smoking when designing this?


October 14, 2015, 1:48 pm

Was really interested until I read "Pentium" processor. Wouldn't be that bad had it been the 15W 4405U pentium, but the N3700 is just pathetic!


October 14, 2015, 1:49 pm

Yup. Your yester-year PT-2000 indeed put this "modern" Ace AIO's specs to shame. :(


October 14, 2015, 1:50 pm

OBTW, does your XPS 18 support the Wacom digitizer?


October 14, 2015, 1:58 pm

I haven't tried but I don't think the XPS 18 supports an active stylus.


January 6, 2016, 5:22 pm

I previously had the Sony Vaio Flip 13a which was nice but ended up being a bomb with too much fan noise. Then switched to an Acer R7-572-6508, the one with a digitizer. (And in my opinion, the best layout for a convertible, since the trackpad was not in the way). Had it upgraded to 12GB, added a better Wi-Fi module and hard drive. The only thing wrong with it was that Acer never upgraded it and caved in to the folks complaining about the trackpad placement. Plus, it was quite heavy lugging it around between home and work. So I went in search for another laptop and noticed that I rather have a portable All-in-one instead. I ended up with the Dell XPS 18 (1820) i5. Upgraded the memory to 12GB, added Win 10 and it has been awesome ever since. Although I'll admit, it does have its cons. 18.4 inches is a bit overkill (in terms of portability). It lacks an HDMI port and I also miss that it doesn't have a digitizer screen and stylus like my previous laptops. Which is why this Acer Z3-700 looked enticing when I first heard about it. The kickstands seem to be the same as the XPS 18, and I wouldn't have mine downgrading 1" to a 17.3" screen. But why did they make it with that Pentium N3700 processor. Why Acer, Why? Hopefully they or some manufacturer will get it right and offer a 17-18" all-in-one with a digitizer.

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