Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

ViewSonic N4060w 40in LCD TV - ViewSonic N4060w

When it comes to screen specifications, the N4060w talks a surprisingly good talk. Especially compelling is the claimed 1000:1 contrast ratio, which holds up very well against most 37in-42in LCD rivals. The brightness claim of 500cd/m2 bodes well too, while the 1,366 x 768 native resolution confirms the screen’s HD Ready stance.

Fed our usual diet of various HD and standard definition sources, the N4060w proves no LCD TV classic, but at the same time certainly doesn’t disgrace itself given its budget positioning.

Starting with its good points, the screen pumps out wholly unexpected levels of brightness. If there’s one thing that tends to be common to many budget TVs, it’s that they’re not as bright as their costlier counterparts. But the N4060w bucks this trend in emphatic style, doing its best to make every last inch of the 40in picture look equally radiantly and intense.

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Not surprisingly this aggressively bright screen characteristic results in some spectacularly vivid colours and an immediately visceral picture that grabs your attention and holds it tight. Basically, when the N4060w’s on, everything in the real world looks kinda bland by comparison.

Yet oddly that’s not to say that the N4060w’s pictures necessarily look unnatural. With bright, colourful scenes, in fact, the TV’s pictures actually appear eminently believable; it’s just that they kind of look how you really want the world to look, rather than how it actually is.

The N4060w bucks another budget trend by presenting HD pictures that really do look very sharp and detailed. Even the subtlest details can be seen in the vast landscapes and intimate cities of Oblivion on the Xbox 360, while HD movies via a Sky HD receiver look suitably textured and crisp.

It’s a relief, too, to find the N4060w less troubled by nasty smearing of moving objects than we might have expected given its price. Even a full-tilt Wayne Rooney failed to cause the sort of response time issues still seen on some LCD TVs costing considerably more.

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