Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

It's become something of a ritual between Riyad and I, to decide who has attended the best press events based upon the capacity of the USB drives full of press info that we inevitably end up acquiring. The current consensus is that anything less than 4GB isn't worth its weight in silicon; with 8GB the preferred minimum to be considered "good." You can imagine, therefore, the battle that took place (which I lost) to determine who would be taking custody of this 32GB flash drive from Verbatim when it arrived in the office.

The Verbatim eSATA/USB Combo SSD 32GB, as the company chooses to call it, leaves little to the imagination with its highly descriptive, if unexciting, title. Like the OCZ Throttle before it, this storage device neatly incorporates an amble portion of flash memory (30GB of formatted capacity to be specific) into a fairly slim casing which offers both a USB and eSATA connector.

The SSD name is arguably a little confusing, given the portable nature of this drive. Still, it can't be denied that the storage is solid state, all 32GB of it. Plus, if you really wanted to you could use this like a conventional hard drive, permanently plugged into your system. The drive shows as a hard drive, rather than a removable storage device, in Windows, after all.

Unlike the OCZ Throttle, which had a mini-USB connector, this drive's is full size. Even more nifty is the slider arrangement which hides the connectors, ensuring they won't break off in your pocket. A slide to the left reveals the USB connector, to the right, eSATA - both locking in place securely until the slider is depressed.

Verbatim also supplies a 'Y' shaped combined USB/eSATA cable, so that the eSATA connector can still be used with unpowered ports. If you're transferring particularly large files it's definitely a better option than deferring to USB transfer speeds which can be outright painful at times. Though of course those more worried about pocket space than how long it takes to copy the latest episode of Top Gear will doubtless appreciate not requiring any cables to use the drive.

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