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8/10

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Unabashed home cinema groupies that we are, we're generally drawn to the larger things in TV life. But we don't focus exclusively on king-sized TVs for the simple reason that there's also a place in any modern home for second or third screens in, say, a kitchen, bedroom or study.

Which leads us not particularly neatly to the subject of today's TV review: the Toshiba 20W330DB.

As its name suggests, this is a 20in LCD TV. What's more, with its single HDMI input, component video input, widescreen design and native resolution of 1,366 x 768, it's also an HD Ready 20in LCD TV - perfect for Sky HD multi-room playback, for connecting up an HD games console, or for connecting a second Blu-ray player (if you're lucky) or an upscaling DVD player (more likely).


Actually, having just reeled those three HD sources off I guess providing just one HDMI input on the 20W300DB is arguably a little stingy on Toshiba's part. But then let's not forget that at under £250 the 20W330DB is unusually cheap for an HD Ready 20in TV from a mainstream brand, so you have to accept compromises somewhere. And if push comes to shove, we'd take a compromise that requires us to occasionally swap HDMI connections over crappy picture quality any day.

Aesthetically the 20W330DB is likeable enough. Its matt black bezel contrasts nicely with the matt silver applied to a strip along the bottom edge and the desktop stand, and the thing feels pretty well built - if surprisingly fat around the back. I should add, though, that I'm always a sucker for a little gloss on a TV versus this Tosh's all-matt finish. And the final look does perhaps appear more 'PC monitor' than 'TV'.

Just as well, then, that the set carries a D-Sub input for direct PC connection. This connection also, of course, ensures that the 20W330DB is equally at home in a study as it is in a bedroom. In fact, the way it can do double duty as a monitor or a TV makes its lowly price look even more remarkable.

At £250 I certainly wouldn't necessarily expect to find a digital tuner built in, but it's got one all the same, complete with pretty much all the electronic programme guide functionality that we now expect as standard from such a device.

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