Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

Next to Apple, Samsung has been the most prolific producer of desirable and sexy MP3 players in recent times. In the past year and a half we've seen two complete ranges of players launched, with the K5 with its built-in speaker and the Bluetooth-equipped YP-T9 of late 2006 and early 2007 being replaced with a collection of sleeker and slimmer devices at the turn end of last year.

We've already reviewed Samsung's iPod Touch rival the YP-P2 and were suitably impressed and it's now the turn of the YP-T10, a smaller player with altogether more humble pretensions. It has in its sights mid-range flash players such as the iPod nano, the iRiver Clix 2, Creative's superb Zen and SanDisk's excellent Sansa View. And it certainly matches all of them on style.


The T10 has to be one of the lightest and slimmest players we've seen at TrustedReviews, and that's not a statement we make lightly. It's not quite credit card thin at 7.9mm, but you pop it in your jeans pocket (front or rear) at your peril, because you're highly likely to forget it's there. It's also Bluetooth enabled (you can connect up to two headsets simultaneously), has an FM radio built in, and a claimed 30-hour battery life, all of which make it really stand out.

It's not a touchscreen device, but the T10 does employ heat-sensitive controls that glow cool white through the gloss black plastic when the player is on and fade to nothing when it's powered down. These work well, and mean the only physical control blemishing the T10's otherwise flawless finish is a combined hold and power control on the device's right hand edge.

The same understated and cool design cannot be said to extend to the menu system, however. Flick the power switch and the screen that greets you is not the usual Samsung cool blue-and-black, but a bright, brash and quirky, cartoon-style system. It makes a change to the achingly sophisticated Apple system and more perfunctory designs on players from Cowon and Archos, but though cute to look at it doesn't offer any significant benefit in terms of usability.

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