Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

Samsung Q45 HSDPA Notebook

The ultra-portable market is one that has come under increasing threat from netbooks like the Asus Eee PC 901 and MSI Wind. As little as a year ago, to get a usable computer with a screen size below 13in could cost you well over £1,000. Even when the 4G Eee came out, it was essentially in a different market class, with its small screen, poor specifications and tiny amount of storage.

However, the more expensive Eee PC 1000 is encroaching further onto ultra-portable territory. This model, sporting a 10in screen, near full size keyboard and, in the H model at least, 80GB hard drive, is blurring the boundary between small notebooks and netbooks. So is there still sufficient reason to get a heavier and bulkier notebook? Well, quite apart from things like a LightScribe optical drive, Samsung makes a very convincing argument with its updated H001 HSDPA Q45, which is absolutely stuffed with features.
/94/0f1c4e/f562/8091-IMG4284s.jpg
Now regular readers might realise we've already reviewed the Samsung Q45 back in 2007, and the Q45 T5450 just a few months ago. But while the H001 model I'm looking at today is physically still identical, there have been a few updates stuffed under the hood. Instead of its predecessor's Intel Core 2 Duo T5450 1.66GHz CPU, there's now a speedy 2.4GHz T8300, and wireless has been upgraded from 802.11b/g to draft-n. Perhaps the biggest upgrade is integrated HSDPA (High-Speed Downlink Packet Access, also known as Mobile Broadband), with network operators like Vodafone already offering 7.2mbps download speeds in major cities and airports. This basically brings high-end ADSL broadband speed within reach the of the mobile consumer, and is great for streaming video (among other things).
/94/6f64c6/b126/8091-IMG4288s.jpg
But for those of you who are new to the Q45 party, let's get started on how this little laptop looks. Samsung has a fairly consistent design across many of its notebook models: a glossy black lid and matte grey or black interior, base and keyboard (unlike the shiny disaster on the Toshiba Satellite A300 177). Like most glossy lids, it is very eye-catching, and like most, after a while this can be for all the wrong reasons: it's a fingerprint and dust magnet, not to mention that any scratches or scrapes will show up really well. A good thing, then, that Samsung provides a nice little cleaning cloth.
/94/9f0fe9/5ce4/8091-IMG4282s.jpg
The only sign of glossiness when you open the notebook up are the shiny integrated 1.3-megapixel camera, glossy screen and touchpad buttons, which are finished in the same mirror-like black as the top of the lid. The rest of the interior is an attractive matte black, which extends from the bezel to the keyboard and touchpad. Apart from a small range of easily removable coloured stickers on the right palm rest, it makes for a minimalist look that's businesslike yet pleasantly stylish. It's actually somewhat reminiscent of the recently reviewed Dell 1310, which is certainly no bad thing.

Next page
comments powered by Disqus