Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

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With the DAB network still - rather shamefully, in our opinion - struggling to deliver anything like nationwide coverage, Internet radio is catching on fast. Especially as it offers literally thousands of channels rather than DAB’s 40 or so.

With this in mind, it’s no surprise to find Internet radios becoming increasingly common. Nothing we’ve seen on the Internet radio front before, though, has been remotely like the Q2 we’re looking at today. Designed around a chipset from British outfit Cambridge Silicon Radio, it’s a truly unique product in a variety of different ways.


For a start, it looks utterly adorable. Its roughly cubic design gets it off to a great start - especially as its surprisingly diddy dimensions mean it fits comfortably into a typical adult’s hand for carrying around between different rooms. But also neat is the fact that you can buy a Q2 in any of five different colours: white, pink, blue, green and black. What’s more, the blue and pink models really push the design boat out by featuring a floral pattern around the front rim that we’d probably adore if we were girls.

Also notable about the Q2’s design is the rubberised finish of the rear three-quarters of the Q2’s body. This boosts the styling but also, of course, makes the radio less likely to slip from your grasp when carrying it around.


Turning our scrutiny of the Q2’s exterior to its rear, it’s a pleasant surprise to find a headphone/line-out jack on there, as well as an input for attaching the supplied USB or three-pin plug charging cables, and a simple on/off switch. As you’d expect these days, the Q2 doesn’t have to be physically tethered to your PC to work, connecting to it via wireless broadband.

Two other intriguing points about the Q2’s design are its complete lack of any buttons or knobs, and the appearance of little lines on each of the radio’s sides (bar the front and back ones). There’s one line on one side, two lines on the next, three lines on another, and four lines on the final one. And it turns out that these curious lines and the striking lack of buttons and knobs are intimately connected...

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