Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

Surprisingly, though, the L32G10 doesn't make particularly great use of its 1,920 x 1,080 pixel resolution when showing high definition sources. Pictures just don't look quite as much of a step up from a good DVD picture as I would have expected, thanks to a slight lack of general crispness.

Easily the set's biggest flaw, though, is its underwhelming black level response. Dark scenes, and even dark parts of otherwise bright scenes, are all afflicted by some really easy to see grey clouding - a fact which means dark scenes look distractingly less dynamic on the L32G10 than bright ones, as well as lacking depth and general credibility.

It doesn't help dark scenes, either, that the dynamic contrast system the TV employs to try and boost its black level response during dark scenes feels over-aggressive, making its brightness adjustments so obvious at times that they can be really quite distracting. More is the pity, then, that you can't choose to deactivate the system if you're as troubled by it as I sometimes was.

Finally in the negative column, pictures generally aren't as bright as I would ideally like them to be. Moreover, while colour tones are mostly good, I did feel at times as if there was a touch more red around than there should be.

Sonically the L32G10 is on a par with the L37G10. Which is to say that it's a bit short of bass and can sound crowded in the mid-range during action scenes, but excels when it comes to eking out the treble detailing and effects placement that often brings a good sound mix to life.

Verdict

While the convenience of having Freesat and Freeview tuners built-in to a 32in TV is laudable, the L32G10's overall performance standards are nothing out of the ordinary, making the £700-plus price is a touch high. It's still a decent TV, but not one that will excite and delight.

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