Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

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Getting onto the TJ65-AU-031UK's connectivity, there's nothing too exciting here but all the basics are covered. You get VGA and HDMI for video, four USB ports (two on each side), microphone and headphone sockets, a memory card reader that will accept SD/HC, MMC, xD and MS/Pro and a Gigabit Ethernet port. For optical drive duties, meanwhile, we have a standard DVD-Rewriter, and there's no sign of the misaligned tray we noticed on the previous TJ65 model.


So far, so average. It must be said though that the TJ65-AU-031UK's internals are far better than one might expect given the lowly £430 asking price. Admittedly a Pentium Dual Core T4300 running at 2.1GHz isn't too impressive when compared to the Core 2 or even Core i7 CPUs in many laptops, but the important thing is that it's more than capable of coping with anything the average consumer might throw at it, and certainly a better alternative than the Celeron CPUs found in many budget mobile systems.

This is backed up by a full 4GB of DDR2 RAM, more than enough for the installed 64-bit version of Windows 7 to feel perfectly comfortable. Storage is also fairly generous with 320GBs' worth spinning at 5,400rpm.

Graphics are of the Intel Integrated variety so won't be up to any but the most basic 3D games (as evidenced by the pathetic 15.1fps in TrackMania Nations Forever at the screen's native 1,366 x 768). Yet like the CPU, for most other tasks, including multimedia and productivity, they're perfectly adequate.

Wireless is up to speed 'n', so pretty much the fastest you can get, though to meet its price point Packard Bell has sacrificed Bluetooth. We're not sure we wouldn't prefer slower WiFi and Bluetooth onboard, but either way the latter is a common omission in this price range while the former is still relatively rare.

Another nice touch is the inclusion of onboard Dolby Sound Room processing, which should lend a little extra perceived depth to audio whether using speakers or headphones.

Speaking of audio, the stereo speakers on the EasyNote TJ65 aren't too bad. While nowhere near as acoustically accomplished as the Harman/kardon models found on the likes of Toshiba's Satellite A500 range, there's still easily audible volume with a decent sense of depth here. Bass is where they fall down, but for casual videos the inbuilt efforts are fine.

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