Summary

Our Score

6/10

Review Price free/subscription

I feel happier about the number pad and other front keys, though. The number keys are as large as the front of the phone will allow them to be, are individually shaped and nicely backlit. The Call and End keys and two softmenu keys are relatively large and have very clear markings, which ensure they are well defined.

The navigation pad isn't the largest in the world but I had no problem using it with the flat of my thumb and its central select key is slightly rounded and raised. All these design features make the keys easy to find and hit. However, I do have quite small hands so if yours are large you may not find it as comfortable to use.


When it comes to features the Tokyo is reasonable but the quality is generally below mid-range. The phone does support mobile e-mail but the screen is really too small to do it justice in any serious way. You can browse WAP sites and I even managed to get onto a couple of Web sites, but the screen size makes the whole exercise a bit pointless - you just can't see enough information to make browsing worthwhile.

Bluetooth is built in and there is also a calendar, to do list manager, alarm and world clock, calculator, currency converter, unit converter, sound recorder, stopwatch and three games. You can compose your own ring tones too.

The composing software is quite clever. You use the number keys to put notes on a musical stave on the screen. The ‘0' key puts in a rest, the ‘8' key puts in a vibration, and the ‘9' key causes the alert light to illuminate.

You can choose three playback speeds: fast, normal, and slow. You can select a variety of instruments: piano, guitar, violin, saxophone, steel drums, flute, harmonica, trumpet, music box, and xylophone. And no, none of them sound much like the real instrument, but they are all noticeably different from one another.

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