Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

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On Tuesday I reviewed the Olympus E-510 digital SLR, a £600 high-spec semi-pro DSLR with body-integral image stabilisation, SSWF anti-dust system and monitor live view, and I was more than a little impressed with it. Today I’m taking a look at the E-510’s little brother, the E-410.



Last year I also reviewed the E-400 and E-500. At that time the model numbers were a little confusing, since the E-500 was the entry-level model, while the more expensive E-400 had the higher specification. This time around however the tables are turned. The E-410 has a lower specification than the E-510, although not by much. It is also around £100 cheaper, costing around £499 with the high-quality 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 Zuiko kit lens, or £599 as a two-lens kit with the addition of a 40-150mm f4-5.6 telephoto zoom. Compare this with the Canon EOS 400D (£479 with an EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 lens), the Nikon D40x (£450 with the rather lovely AF-S DX 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II lens), the Pentax K10D (£499 with an SMC DA 18-55mm) or the Sony Alpha A100 (£449 with an 18-70mm lens), and bear in mind that these last two also have built-in image stabilisation.



When I say that the E-410 has a lower specification than the E-510, in fact the only major feature that it lacks is the image stabilisation system. It has everything else, including the SSWF anti-dust system, live view on a 2.5-in 230Kp LCD monitor, and the ability to use both xD-Picture and CompactFlash cards. Like its larger sibling E-410 has an extremely complete menu system, with lots of user settings such as fully customisable white balance and colour modes, adjustable noise filtering and an anti-shock mirror-up mode, but a few of the more advanced features such as white-balance or flash bracketing, ISO limiter and the ability to alter the size and compression ratios of HQ and SQ image modes have been trimmed off. Like all of Olympus’ other DSLRs it also has a good on-screen quick menu system for most common adjustments, although it does lack several of the one-touch shortcut buttons of the E-510, making the control system a lot less daunting.

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