Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

More importantly than the lighting effects, the triangular number keys might prove to be a little pesky. I found it took a short time to get used to them. They aren't especially small, but there are two factors working against them.

They sit flush with each other and against the fascia which makes them difficult to define with a fingertip. Also, their arrangement as triangles with their apex pointing either upwards or downwards is disorienting. Combined, these design features meant I had to look carefully at what I was pressing while composing texts till I got used to how things were arranged. On the plus side, though, the 7500's dreadful little mini joystick has gone in favour of a diamond shaped navigation pad and large select button.


The OLED screen is impressive. With its 240 x 320 pixels crammed into a space 2.0 inches across it delivers rich, clear and sharp tones. Above it you barely notice the VGA camera for two-way video calling.

The edges of this phone are completely devoid of buttons or connectors apart from a single microUSB port. This is smaller than the standard miniUSB, and has three functions: mains power, PC cable and headphones. This sized connector has been around for a while but is far from standard, so you may find yourself carrying two mains power leads if you have other USB devices to charge on the road.


The headphones are one-piece and their mini USB connector means you are stuck with them. They aren't too bad in terms of quality but this isn't really a handset for the music fan. The headline 1GB of memory might draw you in, but there is no flash memory card support for easily getting tracks on and off the handset, so it is Bluetooth, download over the air or a PC link for this job. And the handset runs S40 so its music player is not as sophisticated as that of S60 handsets.

However the OLED screen helps keep battery life strong and my music playback test - running tunes continuously from the internal memory - lasted for eight hours 45 minutes, which should be enough to keep even the most tune-hungry person happy for a full day without recourse to mains power.

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