Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

Open the phone up and the number pad is as large as space will allow. The keys click nicely when pressed and I had no trouble texting at a fair old lick.

Around the edges you'll find next to no buttons at all. The bottom edge is clear as is the left side. The right side just offers the small mains power connector. The top edge has a release catch for the backplate and a USB connector, which sits under a tight fitting hinged cover that proved fiddly to put back.


You get a USB PC lead with the phone, which is great, but the connector is micro USB which is very annoying as it means you can't simply use the generic mini USB connector you use for many other devices. Yes, I know there are more micro USB connectors around today than there used to be, but if your setup is anything like mine then the majority of your devices are still mini USB.

And if you want more annoyance here it comes. The headset connector shares the micro USB slot. At least this is two-piece and there is a 3.5mm jack past the microphone, but again you need to carry Nokia's micro USB half of the headset around with you or opt for stereo Bluetooth.


When it comes to features this is a middle-of-the-road handset in many respects. It runs Symbian S40, so it is not at the top of the Nokia tree on the operating system front. It is quad-band GSM with 3G and there is a small front camera for video-calling.

There's no GPS antenna but Nokia Maps is built in. Now, with this combination you can find locations and plan routes, but if you want to actually do point-to-point navigation you are going to need a GPS antenna so that'll be a little extra investment for you.

The Web browser is Opera Mini and while it does suffer a little from the small screen size it acquits itself well. There is a little Flickr client too and you can login to your account and upload photos from the phone. At which point, inevitably, we come to the camera.

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