Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters pictures

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Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters
  • Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters
  • Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters
  • Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters
  • Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters
  • Netgear HDXB101 Powerline HD Ethernet Adapters
  • HDXB101 Powerline 200Mbps HD Network Starter Kit

Guilherme Mello

February 19, 2009, 8:42 pm

How far were the two adapters away from each other when you achieved these speeds? I've been reading reviews around the internet and a considerable number of them claim to be achieving speeds below 2mb/s!

Steve Redway

May 3, 2009, 9:59 pm

Power Line Adapters whilst seemingly a good solution to home networking are essentially a very poor technology, polluting the radio spectrum, interfering with your neighbours radio and not adhering to the European EMC directives. Passing these sort of signals, from 2-30MHz down your internal house wiring allows these signal to radiate over several hundreds of meters, much the same as an illegal radio transmitter. The government and OFCOM know the problems regarding Power Line Adapters and will respond when complaints are made by your neighbours in removing the devices, so please ensure that the shop you buy this product from has a sale or return policy.


Home networking has a perfectly good wireless system based on the IEEE 802.11 standards called Wi Fi and operating at 2.4GHz it interferes with no one, is legal, adheres to all European EMC directives and allows you to transfer your broadband and gaming system throughout the house.


There are campaigns afoot both at local and governmental level to have Power Line Adapter removed from the shops and banned, so really they are not such a good idea at all.

Mike Flower

September 10, 2009, 6:15 pm

Sorry Steve, your comments dont hold water.The IEEE 802 basket of standards are good enough but not brilliant, but 802.11 based standards do interefere with other systems. The 2.4GHz spectrum was released to be made public, and unfortunately not to be used exclusively for one type of technology (Bluetooth is one example). As far as I am aware ethernet cabling is not shielded and therefore the interference you refer to woudl be a similar issue?





The current 802. standards in the 2,4GHz is crowded. In my own network at home I am competing against at least 5 neighbours, not to mention our own Wii, all our Bluetooth equipment and our video sender! Drop outs and loss of sychronisation is a regualr occurence. I prefer wireless though and the 5GHz band is far less cluttered at the moment.

Ethernet cable

July 3, 2013, 6:31 pm

The combination of thick brick walls, interference from other devices,
and an inherent limited range make it far too unreliable and slow.

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