Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

People basically want three simple things from a Bluetooth headset: They want it to be comfortable to wear, have good call quality and not look like it's been beaten with the ugly stick. Motorola's H15 seems to have the first of these two licked, but we're not so sure about the third.

Rather than opting for the long and thin look that most other manufactures go for, the H15 is instead rather bulbous. What's more, the mic isn't positioned on the main body of the headset, but instead is found on a flip-out boom. The advantage of the boom is that it's active, so acts as an on/off switch allowing you to save precious battery life when the headset isn't in use. However, the combination of the bulbous body shape and odd looking boom make the H15 rather unattractive looking, at least to our eyes.

On the plus side the headset is pretty comfortable to wear. The ear hook sits nicely over the top of your ear without digging into it and the rubber earpiece covers (there are a number of different sizes included) are soft and malleable enough so as not to irritate the inside of your lughole. The headset initially feels a little bit on the heavy side, but after you've used it for a while you don't really notice this extra weight.

Naturally, to use it with your phone you first have to pair the two devices over Bluetooth. Setting up the pairing process is a little bit easier with the H15 than with most other headsets we've used because it has what Motorola calls Easypair Technology. Essentially every time you open the boom to turn on the headset on it automatically goes into a quick paring mode. So as long as your phone is in pairing mode, when you flip open the H15 it should find it.

Once found it's simply a matter of entering the usual ‘0000' code as the PIN. The headset's LED indicator then changes from blinking blue to solid blue to show it's paired successfully. On the whole, we'd say that the EasyPair feature is pretty neat as it means you don't have to remember some obscure sequence of button presses to get the headset into pairing mode.

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