Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

While driving I couldn’t see any obvious indication that TMC was present. I found the option by pressing the GPS icon and then Settings to see that the device was scanning through the frequencies. However, on my travels most of the time in said that no signal could be found. On one occasion I found that two traffic reports were listed so it does work. However, but it would seem that TMC coverage data seems to be too thin on the ground for it to be an effective tool, at least at present, which is disappointing. By comparison delays, were clearly marked on my TomTom One with its traffic subscription.

Speed cameras are included out of the box and you get a year’s free subscription and the C710 beeped accordingly as you approach them. A great touch is that the speed limit is clearly overlaid onto the map in many places – which could stop you from driving too fast in unfamiliar locations. An interesting feature is the ability to manually add speed cameras, should you spot one that hasn’t yet made it to the database. You can specify their type direction and speed and even upload them to a Mio database for the benefit of other owners.

Despite the presence of the SiRFStarIII chipset I found that often the Mio would take an abnormally long time to pick up the satellites, even in clear weather with no obstructions to the sky, which is a nuisance when you have to get going in a hurry. At other times though, it was virtually instantaneous – an annoying inconsistency.


Verdict

The Mio is a good GPS device let down by an interface that could be more intuitive and by the lack of TMC coverage providing sparse traffic data. The latter in particular would put me off this device. On the up side it works very speedily, the POI database is generally very good and it’s thin and light enough to walking around with on occasion.

Scores In Detail

Value
8/10
Usability
6/10
Features
9/10

Our Score

7/10
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