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Microsoft Wireless BlueTrack Mouse 5000 review

Ardjuna Seghers



Our Score


Review Price free/subscription

Its model number might indicate that Microsoft's Wireless Mouse 5000 sits somewhere between the cheaper 3000 and 'top-of-the-line' 8000 wireless mice. However, due to its use of the company's new BlueTrack sensor technology, it actually has a significant advantage over its higher-numbered but older peers which use laser sensors, in that it will track across almost any surface.

Together with the Wireless Mobile Mouse 4000 and 6000, it is also one of the few rodents in Microsoft's arsenal which are completely ambidextrous, so southpaws rejoice.

The 5000 is a nice-looking device, combining a piano-black top and base with rubberized, textured sides. We like the soft-touch part, but though it looks good the glossy finish picks up fingerprints far too readily - kind of a problem for a device you're constantly touching. Note to all manufacturers: do not use glossy plastics in fingerprint-sensitive areas!

We've yet to come across a symmetrical mouse that's as comfortable as one sculpted to fit a specific paw, but nevertheless the 5000 lies nicely enough in the hand. Because of its low profile and gentle slope it doesn't quite give enough support to your palm - especially after extended use you'll notice the difference between this and a dedicated, contoured right-hander like Logitech's MX1100 or even Microsoft's own Laser Mouse 6000. However, even after lengthy sessions the 5000 doesn't cause actual discomfort.

Microsoft's ambidextrous design also affects the button-layout. It's still a five-button mouse, but rather than the usual two thumb buttons on the left, here we have a single button on each side. This has advantages and disadvantages over the traditional layout: it's more difficult to press whichever button happens to be under your little finger rather than thumb, but at the same time there's no chance of pressing the wrong one, which can be fatal after having just spent ages filling out an online form or during a gaming session.

On the topic of gaming, the BlueTrack Mouse 5000 is not going to be any gamer's weapon of choice. Quite aside from the ergonomic disadvantage, the scroll wheel doesn't offer notched feedback; an essential feature for any serious fragger. It's a choice Microsoft seems to be implementing on all of its non-gaming mice and though it does make scrolling through documents more effortless, it precludes casual gamers from getting the best experience.

Aside from this the only issue we have with the soft-touch four-way scroll wheel is that it doesn't feel particularly sturdy. In fact, when pushing the wheel left or right using just the rubber middle section, it comes away from the thin grey plastic sides, which isn't exactly reassuring. At least its action is smooth, with both sideways-presses and clicks being nice and crisp. Likewise the rest of the mouse's buttons offer positive feedback, but then that's no less than you would expect from one of the biggest players and pioneers in the mouse market.

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October 22, 2009, 8:46 am

"Thankfully eschewing Bluetooth"

Why did you say that? What is bad about using Bluetooth on mice? I would prefer it, as then I could use it on my laptop as well, without having to have a dongle sticking out of it. Please tell me what you think is bad about BT.


May 16, 2010, 12:41 pm

I luckily got this mouse for free (with a keyboard) while purchasing a monitor last week. I tried it as a replacement of my older mouse but that didn't last long. I did like how I could use it effectively on multiple surfaces though the overall feel of the mouse was poor. It feels big, chunky and fat when you hold and the two side buttons are near impossible to access in a comfortable grip. I see how the mouse is made for left/right handers but if you are are right hander just go out and find a mouse built for a right hander. This mouse gives a horrible experience.

Simon Jordan

January 3, 2013, 8:59 am

This mouse is really bad. The "8 month" battery life is a load of shit. Mine last little more than a month. And the scroll wheel button is so useless it can't be pressed without the wheel rolling making it unusable in a CAD situation. the extra buttons are also useless as they are in completely the wrong position. DO NOT buy this mouse without trying it first.

rowan alexander

February 17, 2013, 7:12 pm

it was great until it simply stopped working for no reason after 8 months. Booooo!


May 21, 2013, 2:21 pm

I'm using this mouse for like 4 years now and NEVER had any problem with it. Even though this is a media/comfort mouse, it did a great job in gaming for me. The extra buttons come in really handy for those who want to perform multiple tasks more easily, and they are also placed in a position where the hand doesn't touch them naturally, making it a plus for those who don't want to use them. The battery lasts around 3 - 4 months for me. All in all, this mouse gives a great experience, even for hardcore gaming kids who think the DPI is what actually makes their aim better.

Dave J

June 7, 2013, 10:06 am

Agree - how this mouse got on the market I will never know. Absolutely useless with CAD. Constantly zooms in and out impossible to pan without ending zooming as soon as you take your finger off the buttons wheel. Don't buy it


July 4, 2013, 6:20 am

Dont know what useless batteries you use, but my I'm in my 6th month and still going strong. Also, I game everyday. I have to agree that the wheel sucks balls. If I knew that it was smooth scrolling I wouldn't bought it. Very difficult to click the wheel. But other than that it works fine.

Tait Lawton

August 18, 2014, 3:34 pm

I've had this mouse for a couple years now and it's still the best. I bought a Logitech Performance MX and a Logitech M560, but neither are as smooth or reliable as the MS Wireless 5000. The only drawback for me is that it has the big USB receiver instead of a mini receiver.

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