Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

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Even with the training and the useful tabbed CSS Selector flip-cards, you need to think from the start like a professional designer. This means preparing all the page elements, including basic graphics and photos, before you begin. Expression Web is keyed on structure and Microsoft has taken the opportunity to design the program from the ground up as a standards-based editor. It has none of the baggage Dreamweaver has to carry for legacy compatibility.



CSS is certainly well handled and the CSS palette updates with new styles as you add and edit content. The palette enables you to view and change any of the properties of a given style in a very easy, more intuitive way than with its main rivals.

You can easily flick between design and code views and the code editor both checks lines as you enter them and offers an Intellisense drop-down list for completing commands with a couple of clicks. This speeds up development and helps prevent silly syntax errors, which direct typing can inject into your code.



Dragging and dropping of ASP.Net objects onto your form is really quick and simple and includes some sophisticated examples like calendars and Wizards. However, it’s not just CSS and ASP.Net that Expression Web adheres to. You can also validate your new design against W3C accessibility guidelines which, among others, stipulate that sites should be readable by the visually impaired. To this extent, it reminds you to add captions to images so they can be read by text-to-speech browsers.

One of the strengths Microsoft claims for the program is the accuracy of its web page rendering and it certainly handled the layouts we loaded without problems. This should mean you need to preview your latest edits less frequently, but when you do, you can choose from any browser available on your system.

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