Awards

  • Recommended by TR

Summary

Our Score

8/10

Review Price free/subscription

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Without a doubt, Lenovo has one of the simplest, but also one of the most confusing naming conventions on the planet. Not too long ago we looked at the 3000 C100, the desktop 3000 J100 and then the ultra portable 3000 V100. Can you see the pattern?

Obviously, there are sub-codes in the product name, but even as an overall product series it's confusing. Today we are looking at the Lenovo 3000 N100. Finding this model with the same specifications are our review model proved difficult as there are several models based on the same chassis. Some will have faster processors, less memory or different graphics chips. So remember to look out for the exact details when shopping. The model we had in to review is closest to the TY04HXX.

The chassis itself reminds me of the C100, but this is a 15.4in widescreen with a 1,280 x 800 display instead of the dated 1,024 x 768. It's not a bad display and 1,280 x 800 is more than enough for most people. I certainly feel quite happy using it.

The first thing that struck me about the chassis was that on the top there are icons at the sides indicating where each port is. This is really useful as you aren't left fumbling around looking for a USB port. If in doubt, look on the left hand side, where you will find a single USB port, FireWire, Ethernet, a PC Card slot and an SD Card reader. On the right hand side are another three USB ports and audio connectivity. At the rear of the right panel is a D-SUB connection, and at the back there is an S-Video output too for connecting to a TV.

You'll also find a fingerprint scanner on the device. There is an excellent wizard that guides you through using this when you first boot up the machine, making sure your computer is password protected. Upon using the right fingerprint, it basically takes this password out of storage and logs in for you. If you wanted to, if you perhaps lost your fingers, or wanted to give someone access over the phone, you can access the machine using just your password. This is quite cool as you can just run your finger across the machine to log in, but I've survived the last few years typing passwords in, so I'm sure I could last a few more.

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