Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

LG 37LF66 37in LCD TV

Even in today's world of plummeting prices and cut-throat competition, LG's 37LF66 looks, on the surface at least, to be something a little bit special. For despite being readily available online for under £600, it offers a very respectable 37in screen size together with the sort of features and specifications that you'd be happy to find on a similarly sized TV costing twice as much.

Getting the ball rolling nicely is the TV's very attractive design. Yes, the glossy black bezel isn't particularly innovative, but there's enough class in the TV's subtle sculpting to make it stand out. Plus the glossiness of the finish seems that bit more, well, ‘twinkly' than usual. And you can't beat a bit of twinkle, can you?

The set's connections belie its remarkably low price, too, by placing alongside such likeables as a PC port, SCARTs, a component video input and a digital audio output, two HDMIs that can handle the 1080p/24fps format now delivered from the better HD DVD and Blu-ray players out there.

To clarify this point, having two HDMIs isn't anything special even on a cheap TV; anything less would be criminal these days. But being able to accept a 24p full HD picture certainly cannot be taken as read on a cheap telly. In fact, there are many considerably more expensive TVs around that still don't cater for this purest of HD disc output formats.

Of course, there arguably wouldn't be any great point supporting 1080p/24 playback if the 37LF66 didn't also have a full HD pixel count onboard to show such pristine sources without nasty scaling processing. So it's no great surprise to find the necessary 1,920 x 1,080 pixels all present and correct, complete with an overscanning-free ‘1:1' pixel mapping mode.

While we might not want any scaling taking place with our HD sources, though, we certainly want our standard definition sources to be rescaled to the 37LF66's high pixel count as effectively as possible. And here too the LG seems to have the angles covered thanks to a combination of two image processing systems: LG's own XD Engine, and Faroudja's acclaimed if slightly long-in-the-tooth DCDi system.

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