Summary

Our Score

7/10

User Score

Review Price free/subscription

:

As we’d expect given both its price and its built-in DVD player, the 22LU7000 goes for an HD Ready rather than Full HD resolution. But this is really no big deal on such a small screen, and actually could well lead to better pictures with the standard definition sources likely to be taking up the majority of its time, since the TV won’t have to work so hard with its rescaling processing.

The DVD deck doesn’t only play commercial DVD movies, of course. It also handles Video CDs, CDs, and MP3/JPEG files stored on CD-R/RWs or DVD-R/RWs.


More good news for the 22LU7000’s money finds it supporting 1080p playback (though I guess this probably won’t matter to many people intentionally buying a TV because it’s got a built-in DVD deck!), and sporting a dynamic contrast system that can deliver a solid looking contrast ratio of 8,000:1. Dynamic contrast systems are increasingly common at the low end of the market, but certainly not guaranteed.

Without many picture adjustments or features within the elegantly designed onscreen menus to delay me, and with the 22LU7000’s amazingly low price fixed firmly in my head, I set about actually finding out what the TV could do without really expecting very much. So I guess it’s a minor triumph for the TV that it comfortably excels my expectations in at least some picture departments


Images look bright, for instance, making it more watchable in a very light environment, such as a sunroom, than the majority of its similarly small rivals. In typical LG style, moreover, the brightness helps the 22LU7000 blaze out a really quite intense colour range, with full saturations and plenty of dynamism.

As I hoped would be the case, the 22LU7000 additionally appears to benefit from having an HD Ready rather than a Full HD resolution, since it does a really quite nice job of inserting the extra pixels of picture data necessary to convert DVDs and Freeview broadcasts to its native HD Ready pixel count. There’s more sharpness and less of a tendency to exaggerate noise than we usually see on cheap flat TVs.

Furthermore, the lack of noise evident during DVD playback shows that the integrated DVD deck is at least of a passable quality, with no really distracting MPEG artefacts cropping up during the digital decoding process.

Previous page
Next page
comments powered by Disqus