Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

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JVC’s blurb on this TV also stresses that the new version of DIST being used is housed on a single chip powered by a 32-bit CPU, meaning it should operate at the sort of speeds necessary to process even HD images in real time without leaving unwanted side effects like smearing or video noise.

DynaPix HD also hosts two types of noise reduction: standard and MPEG, the latter of which is designed to counter the blockiness that can afflict low quality digital broadcasts. What’s more, the TV separates out the brightness and colour information in a picture before applying its noise reduction techniques to make their workings more accurate.

The last element of DynaPix HD we want to touch on is something called Super Digipure. This continually analyses the incoming image to see how much inherent contrast it has, automatically ramping up the contrast if the image doesn’t appear to have enough, or toning the TV’s contrast down a little if the image is already highly contrasted.

Having just mentioned them, we might as well start our assessment of the 46DZ7’s picture quality with how well all its various picture processing elements work. With DIST, the answer is that it works supremely well. Standard definition looks much sharper than it does normally on a full HD TV, and crucially the extra detailing is added without seemingly adding significant amounts of noise or other yucky side effects. The noise reduction routines do their work well too, provided you don’t set them too high (for if you do they tend to make high definition pictures look too soft for comfort).

The only DynaPix HD element we have concerns about is Super Digipure. At anything other than the least potent of its various activity settings, it can make pictures look way too harsh and noisy - and even the lowest setting isn’t perfect. So if it were us, we’d leave the feature turned off.

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