Summary

Our Score

8/10

User Score

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Well, it’s about time too. With every serious AV manufacturer falling over themselves to climb aboard the ‘full HD’ bandwagon, a full HD set from JVC is long overdue. But it’s finally here in the shape of the LT-46DZ7, a 46in set that proudly backs up its 1,920 x 1,080 pixel count with absolutely every last drop of JVC’s current TV processing technology.

We’ll come to that technology presently, but let’s start with how the set looks - namely, quite retro for such a cutting edge TV with its black bodywork and blue neon power light. But that’s certainly not to say we don’t like it.

Connections do almost all the HD necessaries, with twin HDMIs and a component video input. But surprisingly none of these HD jacks can take 1080p HD sources, instead topping out at 1080i. When we brought this to JVC’s attention the company was quick to point out that its screen does at least show pictures in 1080p, as onboard processing converts incoming signals to the 1080p format. But we know (since we’re among them!) that there are many AV purists out there who prefer TVs to offer the option of just taking in a ‘pure’ 1080p source and showing it without any deinterlacing processing.

There is some good news when it comes to HD ‘purity’, though, as we discover a mode that allows you to show 1,920 x 1,080 sources on an overscanning-free, pixel-for-pixel basis.

Other connections include a PC port, plus a CI slot for adding subscription channels to what’s obviously a built-in digital tuner.

And so to that picture processing technology we mentioned earlier. Subsumed under a ‘DynaPix HD’ umbrella name can be found a variety of different processing elements. Probably the single most important is JVC’s Digital Image Scaling Technology – or DIST for short. This, as its name suggests, is a sophisticated, all-digital scaling engine focussed on making any necessary image scaling look cleaner; adding extra fine detail to pictures, especially when the source is standard definition; and making the edges of contoured objects less jagged.

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