Summary

Our Score

7/10

Review Price free/subscription

You can also manually adjust the ‘core' backlight level to suit your tastes, turn on or off an automated colour management system, adjust the level of JVC's contrast-boosting Super Digipure processing, and finally switch on or off an MPEG noise reduction system.

While the 32DR1BJ might sound as if it's got a lot going on for a sub-£600 32in LCD TV, though, it's noticeable that there's no high-level motion processing like 100Hz or frame insertion. And unfortunately the absence of such motion-aiding features quickly makes its presence felt once you settle down to see what the TV can do. As the players ran round the pitch during the goal-laden tussle between Aston Villa and Everton over the weekend, for instance, they invariably looked slightly soft and short of detail.

During camera pans across detailed environments, too, fine details tend to go AWOL to a degree not seen with any decent 100Hz TVs. A loss of resolution with motion isn't the 32DR1BJ's only issue with motion either, for watching a 1080p movie from Blu-ray also showed up more judder than I was comfortable with.

Turning to the decent number of things the 32DR1BJ's pictures actually get right, they're impressively sharp and detailed when not having to contend with much motion. This means the set portrays more of the glories of a good HD source - finer textures, sharper edges, a greater sense of depth etc - than the vast majority of other 32in TVs we've seen. Even other Full HD ones.

Impressively, the DynaPix HD processing also helps standard definition pictures look unusually crisp by Full HD LCD TV standards. This is achieved, moreover, without the 32DR1 exaggerating any noise that might be in a standard definition source signal. In fact, the lack of noise apparent during both high and standard definition viewing meant that I never once felt seriously inclined to try out the provided MPEG noise reduction system.

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